Resolve to Eat Right

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With the holidays drawing to a close, it will soon be the time for resolutions.  Why not make eating right a part of your resolution.

Eating right doesn’t have to be complicated.  You can begin with a simple shift to lean meats, fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates into your nutritional regimen while lessening your intake of processed foods, white flour and sugar.

For more information on eating right, contact the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Ambulatory Care Center at  718-670-5486 to speak with a nutritionist.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Eating On-The-Go

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Juggling home and work is a struggle and maintaining healthy eating habits while we are on-the-go can add to its level of difficulty.  Or should it?

Here are some tips that may make your hectic lifestyle somewhat simpler by planning meals on-the-go:

Plan your menu – Planning meals well in advance will help make sure your meals are healthier and well-balanced.

Avoid fast food baked goods for breakfast – Instead of choosing a wholesome “looking” muffin, reach for a yogurt smoothie.  It will provide you with vitamin C and potassium, high fiber and keep you full from breakfast to lunch.

Prepare Coffee or Tea at home – While waiting in line at your local coffee shop, you may be more apt to choose an unhealthy breakfast choice.  Skip the impulse purchase and brew your coffee or tea at home.

Eat lunch – When you’re busy, it’s easy to lose track of time and skip lunch.  No matter how heavy your workload, make time to leave the office and eat your brown bagged lunch.  Starving through lunch will only lead to overeating later.

Dine-out – You are bound to grab a meal outside of home due to family activities and busy schedules.  That doesn’t mean you have to leave your healthy choices behind.  Eat moderately and divide your plate into two servings.  Ask for a bag to take your leftovers home.  Only eat until you are satisfied, not stuffed.

Eating on the run is never ideal, but it will inevitably happen to most of us.  You need to prioritize time to eat healthy and although a home cooked meal isn’t always possible, that doesn’t mean you can’t make good choices on the go.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Take a Break

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Studies have shown that taking regular breaks during the work day can improve productivity and mental acuity, reduce fatigue, relieve joint or muscle pain, and increase overall alertness.

Chronic stress from over working can put a strain on your body and put you at risk for poor health. Taking a break can give your body the chance to turn off the stress so that you can recuperate and repair.

Research has shown that people on a break feel healthier, have less physical complaints and could have a reduction in cholesterol levels on their return.

Some other benefits of taking a break or vacation are:

  • Vitamin D – The Sun is rich in Vitamin D which is essential for maintaining healthy bones and keeping the immune systems and nervous system functioning normally.
  • Relaxing – Taking time to relax on a break from working has powerful benefits for adults. It can be as important as sleep.

Break time shrinks stress – Time away from work helps shrink stress and anxiety while boosting mental and physical health.

Keep in mind that regularly scheduled breaks should be approved by your supervisor.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Whole Wheat Pumpkin Beer Bread

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October conjures up images of falling leaves, Halloween and fall cuisine. Try this healthy, light whole wheat pumpkin beer bread courtesy of SheKnows.

Yields: 8 slices

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2-3 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 12 ounces beer (I used Sam Adams Oktoberfest)
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin
  • 2 tablespoons melted margarine (*optional)
  • Cooking spray

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Grease a loaf pan with cooking spray.
  2. Combine flours, baking powder, salt, pumpkin pie spice and sugars. Gradually add the beer and canned pumpkin. Mix until fully combined. Add additional pumpkin pie spice for flavor.
  3. Pour mixture into the loaf pan and then pour melted margarine over it.
  4. Bake for 50-60 minutes until loaf is fully cooked (a toothpick comes out clean when inserted).

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Best High Fiber Foods For Diabetics

 

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People with Type 2 diabetes need to control both their weight and sugar levels. Consuming a diet high in fiber is the best way to accomplish those goals.

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many high-fiber foods are naturally low in sugar, fat and calories helping diabetics reduce the risk for diabetes complications. The FDA recommends an average daily intake of 25g of dietary fiber for adults. Some of the best sources of fiber include:

. High fiber fruit like berries, citrus fruits, as well as Asian and domestic pears.

. Orange vegetables such as sweet potato, pumpkin, squash and carrots.

. Green vegetables like cooked collards, turnip greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, spinach and artichokes.

. Whole grains such as whole wheat pasta, brown rice and barley.

. Beans including soybeans, navy, pinto black and kidney beans, split and black-eyed peas and lentils.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Protect Your Skin, Naturally!

 

Wearing sunscreen isn’t the only way to ensure UV protection. During the dog days of summer when the sun is at its hottest try these three delicious fresh fruits and vegetables that naturally offer UV protection.

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. Citrus fruit – Bring some fresh lemonade to the beach! Lemons, oranges and limes all contain limonene, which studies have shown to reduce skin cancer risk by 34 percent.

. Carrots and Red peppers – Snack on some crudité by the pool! Red, yellow and orange vegetables provide carotenoids that help to reduce sunburn intensity.

.  Spinach – Take a smoothie to the ball park! Leafy greens, like dark green lettuce, spinach, kale, and Swiss chard are great sources of the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin that studies how halt abnormal cell growth prompted by UV light.

Remember that these fruits and vegetables are not a substitute for wearing sunscreen and protective clothing when outside in the sun, but they may give you an extra line of defense in saving your skin down the line.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

April is IBS Awareness Month: Probiotics and Prebiotics

You may have heard a lot about probiotics recently, but what exactly are they? Probiotics are live organisms, specifically beneficial bacteria, that live in your intestines and help process indigestible fibers and keep bowel function regular. They produce a number of vitamins, including B6, B12, and K2, and aid in the absorption of minerals such as iron, calcium, and magnesium.

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Probiotics are found in yogurt, kefir, milk, and in fermented foods like sour pickles, sauerkraut, kimchee and miso. They can also be taken as over-the-counter supplements.

Although more research is needed, there’s evidence that probiotics may:

.Treat diarrhea, especially after taking certain antibiotics

.Prevent and treat vaginal yeast infections and urinary tract infections

.Treat irritable bowel syndrome

Speed treatment of certain intestinal infections, like Salmonella and E. coli

.Prevent or reduce the severity of colds and flu

.Calm your immune system if you’re prone to allergies or eczema

.Help with anxiety, depression and other mood disorders

So what’s the deal with prebiotics?

Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrates that act as food for probiotics. Prebiotics are found in whole grains, bananas, onions, leeks, garlic, honey, asparagus, soybeans and artichokes. When probiotics and prebiotics are combined they form an interdependent, beneficial relationship. One is the live bacteria and the other is the fuel needed to thrive.

Side effects are rare, and most healthy adults can safely add foods, or supplements, that contain prebiotics and probiotics to their diets. If you’re considering taking supplements, check with your doctor to be sure that they’re right for you.

For more health, fitness and lifestyle tips, follow us on Twitter @FHMC_NYC, and like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FlushingHospital

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Your Child and the Battle Against Junk Food

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Childhood obesity has become a common health concern for parents. It is estimated that one in every five children is overweight.  An obese child is considered well above the normal weight for their age and height. One of the contributing factors in obesity is unhealthy eating habits. Parents should introduce healthy eating to children as early as possible.  For some this may be easier said than done, because children love junk food.

What makes junk food enticing to children is sugar, high sodium, the taste of fat-commonly hydrogenated oils, in addition to bright, colorful packaging, fun shapes and unnatural food coloring. Parents can win the fight against junk food by making healthy food more appealing to children’s senses.

Here are a few tips on converting kid favorites into healthier choices:

  • Hot dogs- instead of regular beef and pork hot dogs, purchase low sodium turkey franks and ones without added nitrates. Decorate the hot dog with colorful vegetables such as cucumbers, carrots, red and yellow peppers.
  • Salty cheese snacks- make plain cheese fun by cutting it into quirky shapes or adding bright and sweet fruit. You can make cheese and fruit shish kebabs.
  • French fries- opt for baked sweet potato fries and sprinkle lightly with sea salt. Sweet potatoes are high in vitamin C, B6, and D. They are a great source of Iron, magnesium and potassium.
  • Ice cream- frozen yogurt is just as tasty and contains less sugar and fat. Adding toppings such as fruit and granola is a plus.
  • Popsicles- freeze real fruit juices with bits of fruit into bars.
  • Potato chips- kale chips are rich in vitamin A and easy to make at home. Make them delicious by adding herbs and spices.
  • Candy- healthy alternatives to candy include raisins or strawberries and bananas lightly drizzled with chocolate.
  • Milk shakes- smoothies made with fresh fruit and low fat yogurt are a healthier option.
  • Meat lasagna- load lasagna with vegetables instead of meat, choose low fat cheese and whole-grain pasta.
  • Macaroni and cheese-use low fat cheese and Greek yogurt to make it creamy. Add spinach to make it nutritious.

The battle against junk food is not lost. In addition to healthy eating, keep your family physically active and make an appointment with your family doctor to ensure that everyone is at their recommended weight.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.