Healthy Heart = A Health You

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Every year, more than 1.2 million Americans die from heart attacks. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost 50 percent of those deaths occur outside the hospital—a figure suggesting many people with heart disease don’t act on early warning signs.

Some signs to watch for are chest pain or discomfort that lasts more than a few minutes, shortness of breath, cold sweats, nausea, lightheadedness, and upper body discomfort are  red flags and an indication to immediately call 911. Just a few wasted minutes can stand between life or death.”

There are several factors that can put you at risk for heart disease, including high blood pressure, being overweight, having diabetes, and being over 55 years old for men and 65 years old for women.

Individuals who maintain a nutritious diet, exercise regularly, manage stress, and quit smoking, in  addition to making healthy lifestyle changes, or are taking your heart medication regularly are great ways to protect yourself against heart health conditions.

Flushing Hospital offers a non-invasive Cardiology Lab, as well as other services for heart diseases, such as arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, and cardiomyopathy.
Our non-invasive Cardiology Laboratory performs the following tests:

• Electrocardiograms, which allow the electrical activity of the heart to be examined
• Echocardiograms, which use sound waves to take pictures of the heart to assess how it is working
• Stress tests, both chemical and exercise, with and without imaging modalities to assess the blood flow to the heart and the function of the heart with exercise
• Holter monitors
• Event recorders
• Tilt table testing
• Nuclear wall motion studies
• Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

Non-invasive treatment of coronary artery disease is available for patients who are not candidates for angioplasty, stenting or coronary artery bypass surgery, but who have continued chest pain or angina.

To speak with a cardiologist about your heart health or to obtain more information about the cardiology services offered at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5489.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hydrotherapy Rehabilitation

Hydrotherapy When we receive significant physical injury or have medical conditions that cause pain, physical therapy is often recommended to help with recovery.  A very soothing and relaxing form of treatment is water or hydrotherapy.

Hydrotherapy has been used for hundreds of years. It utilizes the healing properties of water and the body’s reaction to it at different temperatures. For instance, cold water may be used to reduce inflammation while warm water may be used to increase circulation.

Water therapy has proven effective in treating certain conditions such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, muscle strains or tears, back pain or head injuries

There are many benefits a patient can achieve from hydrotherapy, they include:

  • Pain relief
  • Increased circulation
  • Re-education of paralyzed muscles
  • Increased range of motion in joints
  • Strengthening weak muscles
  • Rehabilitating injured limbs

Hydrotherapy may not be recommended for patients with heart disease, hypertension or vascular conditions.  Each case is unique to the individual and speaking with a doctor is highly recommended.

The Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a multi-disciplinary team approach to the treatment of conditions and injuries. Following an assessment by a physician and therapist, a program is developed to achieve maximum results. A patient’s program may involve the use of therapeutic exercise, heat, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, hydrotherapy, and patient education. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 670-5515.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Protect Yourself From Getting Sick While Flying

preventing sickness while flyingAir travelers are up to 100 times more likely to catch a cold or the flu while flying than during normal day-to-day activities.

The primary cause for an increased rate of infection is low cabin humidity on planes. Most airplanes fly in an elevation range of 30,000 to 35,000 feet, where humidity is much lower. At very low levels of humidity, our natural defense system of mucus in our noses and throats dries up, creating an ideal environment for germs to infect us.

The best way to maintain these natural defenses is to stay hydrated. Drinking plenty of water will not only counter the overall dehydrating effects of air travel, but it can actually strengthen the body’s natural immune system.

It is recommended to sip water regularly throughout the flight rather than drink a large amount at once to protect against long dry spells in your defense system. Hot beverages are a good way to keep your protective mucous membranes working because they assist in keeping you generally hydrated and also provide moisture in the form of steam. Conversely, it is recommended that you avoid caffeine or alcoholic beverages as they can dehydrate you.

Using nasal sprays or saline mists have also been proven to be an effective means of keeping mucous membranes in your nose and throat moist. They can increase your resistance to infection while on a dry aircraft. Yet another way to defend against viruses while flying is to use a germ-killing mouthwash, which adds another layer of protection while simultaneously helping to keep your throat moist. Other experts recommend taking vitamins before flights to help boost immunity levels.

By following these tips and practicing proper hand washing behavior, you will greatly increase your chances of arriving at your destination healthy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Food Preparation Safety Tips

night hunger. Woman in the dark at open refrigerator

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that each year roughly one in six Americans (or 48 million people) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases.  More than 200 diseases, like salmonella, listeria and e. coli, are spread through improper food handling, causing symptoms such as stomach pains, vomiting and diarrhea.

With holiday season and lots of gatherings where eating is a must, on the way, here are five food handling tips that will help make your meals safer:

  1. Keep clean – Wash your hands before handling food and often during food preparation. Wash your hands after using the bathroom.  Keep food preparation surfaces and equipment clean.
  2. Keep raw and cooked food separate – Store food in containers to prevent cross contamination.
  3. Cook thoroughly – Be sure to cook and reheat food thoroughly, especially meat, poultry, eggs and seafood. Use a meat thermometer to check cooking temperatures.
  4. Store food at safe temperatures – Don’t leave cooked food at room temperature for more than two hours. Refrigerate all cooked and perishable foods below 5 degrees Celsius. Don’t keep leftovers too long and always defrost food in the fridge, not on the counter.
  5. Choose foods wisely – Thoroughly wash fruits and vegetables before eating and don’t use food beyond its expiration date.

These few simple guidelines will help keep your food and kitchen cleaner, and your family healthier.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is COPD Awareness Month

Senior woman with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with supplemental oxygen

Senior woman with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with supplemental oxygen

The month of November is recognized as COPD Awareness Month. The purpose of this designation is to bring awareness to the severity of this disease and show how many people are affected by it.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a term used to describe different diseases that are related and that affect a person’s ability to breath. There are an estimated 15 million adults that have been diagnosed with the disease and approximately the same number who have the disease but who haven’t been formally diagnosed. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Some factors that contribute to developing COPD are smoking, inhaling second hand smoke, genetic factors, breathing in occupational dust and chemicals and spending long periods of time in areas with high amounts of air pollution.
Symptoms of COPD include:
Breathlessness
Chronic coughing
Wheezing
There is no cure for the disease. Presently treatment consists of alleviating some of the symptoms. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding and the Working Mom

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding and working is a challenge you can overcome.

breastfeeding1-300x204

Here are some suggestions designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier:

1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.

2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.

3. Ask if your company provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.

4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care department at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

toothache, hurts of bad tooth, stomatitis, mouth ulcer

At any time our bodies can throw us for a loop with unexpected symptoms to sometimes throw us off our game. Ideally it would be great to have a live-in doctor for a quick fix but home remedies are the next best thing.

Toothaches are an annoyance that isn’t always the most affordable fix. If you aren’t able to get to the dentist immediately and the pain is too much to handle, this home remedy fix might offer you some relief until your appointment.

There are essential oils that help ease toothache pain include chamomile, myrrh, peppermint, and tea tree. Apply one drop of any of these or a drop of “Toothache Oil” to the tooth and the surrounding area to ease the pain.

Toothache Oil

1/8 ounce carrier oil

6 drops tea tree oil

4 drops chamomile oil

2 drops myrrh oil

2 drops peppermint oil

Place the carrier oil in a clean container and add the essential oils. Gently turn the container upside down several times or roll it between your hands for a few minutes to blend. Apply one drop on the aching tooth and the surrounding gum, as needed.

These remedies are only suggestions for temporary pain relief. If you develop a toothache, you should consult your dentist as soon as possible. The dental department at Flushing Hospital Medical Center is available to treat your dental pains. To schedule an appointment please call, 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Is Hepatitis B?

Hepatitis

Hepatitis B, a virus that can cause severe illness, liver damage, and even death, affects over one million Americans; many of these people display no symptoms and are unaware that they are carriers, which can lead to them unknowingly spreading the virus.

While there are measures many can follow to prevent the spread of Hepatitis B, there is one group that requires others to keep them safe – newborns.

There are a variety of ways Hepatitis B can be spread. They include: having unprotected sex, sharing needles, body piercing & tattoos, or using a carrier’s toothbrush or razor, but one of the most common ways to spread the virus is from mother to baby at birth.

Through proper pre-natal care, babies can be protected from getting infected.   During their initial prenatal visit, mothers should receive a series of routine blood tests, including tests to check for Hepatitis B. If you test positive, your doctor can take special precautions at the time of delivery to treat your baby immediately after birth, which would most likely prevent infection.

Within 12 hours after you give birth, your doctor will give your baby a shot of Hepatitis B antibodies and an initial shot of the Hepatitis B vaccine. That should be adequate short-term protection from hepatitis B. Together, the antibodies and the vaccine are about 85 to 95 percent effective at preventing hepatitis B infection in babies. The second and third vaccines doses should be administered at regular well-baby check-ups. All three doses are necessary for life-long protection against Hepatitis B.

If you are pregnancy, make sure your doctor tests you for Hepatitis B. If you do not have a doctor, Flushing Hospital’s Women’s Health Center has expert doctors who can guide you through your entire pregnancy. To schedule an appointment, please call 718-670-8993.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Dentures

Dentures isolated on a white background.

Dentures have been around for thousands of years. It is believed that they were first used around 700 B.C. by the Etruscans in ancient Italy. These were made from either human teeth or animal teeth.

Until the 1,800’s the most commonly used material for making dentures was ivory that came from elephants, walruses, and hippos. In fact, it has been found that the first U.S. President George Washington’s dentures were also made of ivory, although many have mistakenly believed they were made of wood.

In the late 1700’s a man by the name of Alexis Duchâteau crafted the first porcelain dentures, however these were not popular as they were not sturdy and often chipped. People were also not happy with the fact that they were too white and didn’t look real.

In the 1820’s an English silversmith named Claudius Ash developed a set of dentures that were made of porcelain teeth mounted on 18-karat gold plates, with gold springs and swivels. This was a large improvement to the dentures that had been made previously.

In the 1850’s craftsmen began to make dentures from a hardened rubber called vulcanite into which porcelain teeth were inserted. During the twentieth century other materials came in to use such as acrylic resin and plastics.

Jamaica Hospital’s Department of Dentistry provides the community with the latest and innovative technologies in dental care.  Our inter-disciplinary staff is specially trained to provide the highest quality care and is dedicated to making your visit as comfortable as possible.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5522.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Gastric Bypass Surgery Right For You?

Is being overweight affecting your health and overall quality of life? For several people,the answer is yes. Obesity is a disease that affects more than one-third of people in the United States. It is the second leading cause of preventable death.

The contributing factors that can lead to obesity include metabolic, pre-existing health conditions, eating disorders, environment and genetics.

Overcoming obesity can be difficult. You may have tried several weight loss treatments or methods that include diet and exercise to lose weight, but were unsuccessful. Bariatric (weight loss) surgery is an option that has proven to be effective in producing significant weight loss.

One of the most commonly performed types of bariatric surgery is gastric bypass surgery. The procedure requires a surgeon to divide the stomach into two parts (one small and one large). The surgeon may use staples or vertical banding to create a small pouch from the upper part of the stomach.

The small pouch is then directly attached to the small intestine bypassing the rest of the stomach and the upper part of the small intestine. This limits the amount of food that can be eaten and reduces the fat and calories that can be absorbed. The larger part of the stomach will remain intact to produce digestive juices. This surgery is usually performed laparoscopically.

The benefits of having this procedure may include:
•Accelerated weight loss
•Improvement in quality of life
•Improvement in obesity- related medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol

There are several accepted medical criteria that will determine if you are a candidate for surgery. You may be eligible if:
•You have a body mass index (BMI) over 40
•Are 100 lbs. or more over your ideal body weight
•Are experiencing disabling pain in weight-bearing joints
•You have a BMI of 35 along with obesity-related disorders such as high blood pressure, diabetes, sleep apnea or degenerative joint disease.
•Your efforts to lose weight through diet and exercise have been unsuccessful

If you meet these requirements and are considering moving forward with bypass surgery, there a few things you can expect after the procedure:
•You may experience pain at the incision site; however, your medical team will be available to help you in keeping your pain under control.
•There is a possibility that you may experience discomfort from the gas used during laparoscopic surgery.
•You will be asked to walk on the day of your surgery as frequently as possible. This will promote circulation and prevent blood from clotting.
•To prevent possible complications such as pneumonia, you may be asked to take deep breaths and breathe into an instrument called an incentive spirometer and cough frequently.
•You will be given ice chips and water to sip, if these are not rejected by the body, you will be placed on a clear liquid diet. Gradually you will be able to ingest solid foods.
•Prior to discharge, the surgeon, nurse or discharge coordinator will instruct you to follow a specific diet.

When combined with eating a healthy diet and exercise, gastric bypass surgery can offer long-term weight loss success. It is important to keep in mind that each case is unique to the individual and it is suggested that you consult a bariatric surgeon for an assessment.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a unique and multidisciplinary program that involves a complete mind, body and wellness approach to weight loss surgery. For more information about the Bariatric Surgery Services at Flushing Hospital or procedures performed by our doctors, please call 718-670-8908

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.