How To Brighten Your Smile At Home

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3 Natural Ways to Whiten Your Teeth At Home

Without a doubt winter is the toughest season on our teeth, with all those coffees, teas and hot cocoa’s we drink to keep us warm. So how do you keep your pearly whites their whitest without breaking the bank? Here are three easy, natural and budget-friendly home remedies to keep your smile looking it’s best all through winter!

You will need your favorite toothpaste, 1 teaspoon of baking soda, 1 teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide, and half a teaspoon of water.

Mix these together and apply to your teeth with a standard toothbrush. Brush as normal. Use this remedy once a week until you reach your desired results. Once you have achieved sparkling teeth, try to limit yourself to using this remedy just once a month.

For a fruity take on whiter teeth, you can try mashing up a strawberry and mixing it with a small amount of baking soda to create your own whitening toothpaste. The acids in the strawberry work to polish and whiten your teeth. Limit this remedy to about once a month.

Rinsing your mouth with coconut oil (called ‘oil pulling’) is a unique, old, remedy that people swear by to help whiten teeth. It won’t make a difference by “bleaching” per say, but lauric acid in coconut oil can rid your teeth of bacteria found in plaque that can make them yellow. It is also supposed to promote gum health, and help keep your breath fresh.

You will need about a tablespoon of natural coconut oil. This can be found in health food markets if not available in your local supermarket.

Before you brush your teeth, scoop out a tablespoon or a little less (depending on the size of your mouth) of coconut oil. You can either soften it, or just put it in your mouth. Push, swish, and “pull” the oil through and around your teeth for 10-15 minutes, then spit it out, rinse with water, and brush your teeth.

Remember to brush after every meal and floss after snacks. Now that you have these teeth whitening tips you can be on your way to a brighter smile!

To schedule a dental appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How to Treat a Sprained Ankle

Ankle Tensor BandageAn ankle sprain occurs when you have stretched or torn the ligaments in your ankle. This is often caused by making too quick of a movement, which forces the joint out of its normal position.

Ankle sprains can range from mild to severe, depending on how much damage has been done to the ligaments.  Typically symptoms include:

  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Stiffness or restricted range of motion
  • Redness or warmth in the area

If your symptoms are mild you can treat your injury by:

  • Applying ice- This will help in reducing swelling and pain.
  • Resting the ankle- This can be done by using crutches and keeping the affected leg elevated.
  • Taking over the counter (OTC) painkillers- OTC painkillers such as ibuprofen are effective in managing pain and swelling.
  • Applying compressions- Wrapping your ankle with adhesive bandages or wearing a brace will help reduce swelling and provide protection.

Typically mild sprains tend to last seven to ten days; however, if you are experiencing intense pain, abnormal swelling and are unable to place weight on your ankle, it is likely that your case is severe and needs immediate medical attention.

If left untreated severe ankle sprains can lead to chronic ankle instability, chronic pain and early onset arthritis.  To reduce the risk of furthering your injury, schedule an appointment with your doctor if symptoms continue past 10 days.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Division of Orthopedics is staffed with highly trained and respected doctors in their field. The division recently welcomed fellowship-trained surgeons, Drs. George Ackerman and Teo Mendez from Manhattan-based New York Orthopedics.  Both physicians specialize in the treatment and surgical procedures of the knee, foot and ankle, shoulder, hip, and elbow, as well as sports-related injuries. They have worked extensively as team physicians for both professional and college sports teams. To schedule an appointment with an orthopedist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Eating Disorders Myths Debunked

eating disorders-487759108“You can tell if someone has an eating disorder by looking at them,” “eating disorders are caused by a diet gone too far,” and “only young women are affected”   are some of the popular misconceptions associated with eating disorders.

Studies show that despite growing awareness and education about eating disorders, many people still continue to view myths such as these as factual.  This is dangerous as misinformation can result in the denial of symptoms and the validation of harmful behaviors.

In an effort to stop the spread of harmful information, we are providing the following myths and facts about eating disorders:

Myth –You can tell if someone has an eating disorder by looking at them.

Fact- Many individuals with eating disorders seem healthy in appearance. In several circumstances weight loss or weight gain may not be obvious during the onset of eating disorders.  It is also common for sufferers to learn how to hide symptoms of their illness by doing things such as wearing baggy clothing.

Myth- Eating disorders are lifestyle choices or result from diets taken too far.

Fact – Going on a diet is a choice and having an eating disorder is not.  Eating disorders are life- threatening illnesses that are associated with psychological, social or emotional distress.

Myth- Only adolescent women are affected by eating disorders.

Fact- Eating disorders do not discriminate by gender or age.  In fact it is estimated that 10 million men living in the United States have an eating disorder.  More and more people are seeking treatment for these disorders in their twenties and up.  There three main groups of people that fit into this category:

  • Those who secretly struggle with eating disorders for years without seeking treatment.
  • Those who received treatment earlier in life and are experiencing recurring symptoms
  • Those who have developed eating disorders as adults

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Turkey Chili Recipe

chili Incredible, perfectly spiced healthy chili made with lean ground turkey, kidney beans and corn. This version is simply the best if you are looking for a healthy and quick option. Here is what you will need to enjoy this recipe:

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 yellow onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, minced

1 medium red bell pepper, chopped

1 pound extra lean ground turkey or chicken (99%)

4 tablespoons chili powder

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste

1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes

1 1/4 cups chicken broth

2 (15 oz) cans dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained

1 (15 oz) can sweet corn, rinsed and drained

 

For topping: cheese, avocado, tortilla chips, cilantro, sour cream

Instructions: Place oil in a large pot and place over medium high heat. Add in onion, garlic and red pepper and sauté for 5-7 minutes, stirring frequently. Next add in ground turkey and break up the meat; cooking until no longer pink. Next add in chili powder, cumin, oregano, cayenne pepper and salt; stir for about 20 seconds.

Next add in tomatoes, chicken broth, kidney beans and corn. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 30-45 minutes or until chili thickens and flavors come together. Taste and adjust seasonings and salt as necessary. Garnish with anything you’d like.

Happy eating!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – Urology

The Department of Urology at Flushing Hospital is staffed by fully trained, board certified urologists, specially trained physician assistants, registered nurses and medical assistants.  The department utilizes state-of-the art diagnostic equipment and minimally invasive techniques to provide comprehensive care to our patients. The department treats both men and women with an understanding of the sensitive nature of urologic illnesses, and with special emphasis for women on bladder control and urinary tract infections, and for men enlarged prostate, urinary vasectomies, male sexual health and prostate cancer.
One of the commonly treated urologic conditions in both women and men is kidney stones. The department of urology has a kidney stone treatment center that can diagnose and treat this condition quickly. A Spiral CT scanner is used to locate the stone(s )which eliminates the need to use  contrast dyes. Non-surgical modalities in the form of shock wave lithotripsy break up smaller stones into fine particles. For larger stones, a Holium laser and miniscope are used.
For patients with prostate cancer radioactive seed implantation can be performed  by ultrasound guidance with pinpoint accuracy.
The Department of Urology also offers the da Vinci Robotic Surgical platform for prostate surgery. This new technology allows our surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgical procedures that benefit our patients through faster recovery time, less blood loss, less pain, and shorter hospitalizations.
To schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Urology suite, please call 718-670-5699.Urology

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Rare but true: Eisoptrophobia- A Fear of Mirrors

fear of mirrors -164833651How many times do you look in the mirror each day?  Could you imagine not being able to use a mirror because you were afraid of it or seeing your reflection in it? For some people, this is a reality.  Eisoptrophobia is a rare phobia, that causes sufferers  to be irrationally fearful of mirrors or seeing themselves in a mirror.

Those with this phobia present some of the following symptoms or reactions:

  • Anxiety
  • Panic
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dry mouth
  • Excessive sweating
  • Nausea
  • Shaking
  • Rapid heartbeat

These symptoms vary by individual and the level of fear experienced in the presence of mirrors.

Many believe that this fear occurs in response to a number of factors such as superstition, poor self-image or the result of a traumatic event.

Several treatment approaches are utilized by mental health professionals; they involve anti- anxiety medication, psychotherapy, relaxation techniques or exposure therapy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Monday Motivation

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“The best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend.” -President Abraham Lincoln

Flushing Hospital Medical Center wishes you a Happy President’s Day!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is National Cancer Prevention Month

February is National Cancer Prevention Month. During this time of month, Flushing Hospital urges everyone to adopt healthy lifestyle practices to reduce the likelihood of developing cancer.

ThinkstockPhotos-159290583According to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) there are three factors that we have control over that affects our risk of developing this terrible disease. They are: What we eat, how active we are and how much we weigh. The AICR states that the best protection against cancer is to control all three.

Let’s look at them one at a time:

What We Eat
Choosing a diet consisting mostly of plant foods and limiting red meat and avoiding processed food is the best defense. Preparing meals focused around vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans will help you fortify your body against cancer.

How Active We Are
Being physically active for at least 30 minutes each day. Participating in any number of physical activities can lower your risk for colon cancer and possibly several other cancers as well. To fit time in your schedule, try breaking activities into 10-15 minute sessions.

What We Weigh
It is the third key to help protect against as many as six different types of cancer. The good news is that once you start following the first two guidelines about diet and physical activity, you’ll find it easier to accomplish this one.

Flushing Hospital joins the American Institute of Cancer Research to bring awareness to how we can reduce our chances of getting cancer by altering our daily lives.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Instrument Sterilization

200470463-001Instruments that come in contact with the body during all surgical procedures and many non-surgical procedures must be free of all microbial elements. This is to ensure that the risk of infection is kept to a minimum.
Throughout history different methods were adopted using materials that were available at that time. In 3000 BC the Egyptians used pitch and tar as antiseptics. In later years the fumes from burning sulfur were found to cleanse objects of infectious material.
In 1680 a French physicist, Denis Papin invented a pressure cooker that would trap boiling water, convert it into steam, and was found to cleanse objects by cooking them. This device was further improved upon during the next two hundred years and it became possible to additionally sterilize linens, dressings, gowns using steam. Two major contributions to the art of sterilization came in the 1860’s when the French chemist and microbiologist Louis Pasteur wrote extensively on how germs cause disease and the English physician, Joseph Lister, developed a technique that used carbolic acid as a spray to disinfect instruments. During the late 1800’s steam sterilization became much more widespread. Surgical instruments were also being made out of materials that were better able to withstand high levels of heat. This allowed them to be processed at higher temperatures and  were being made with smooth surfaces which allowed for more thorough cleaning.
During the 1900’s various improvements were introduced. This included sterilization with steam,  irradiation, with glutaraldehyde. More recently, sterilization of instruments can be achieved using high temperature / high pressure, ultraviolet light, and the  most commonly used chemical for sterilization is ethylene oxide.  It can be used on almost all instruments, both metal and non-metal.
The importance of cleanliness when it involves objects that come in contact with the body cannot be stressed enough. It was recognized in ancient times and improvements are still evolving today for the safety of patients.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is There a Link Between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease?

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It is not unusual for people with Type 1 diabetes to also have celiac disease. Type 1diabetes and celiac disease share several common traits. Both diseases are triggered by genetic and environmental factors and they increase the risk of developing associated autoimmune diseases.

Type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes causes the body to produce insufficient amounts of insulin needed to break down glucose

Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is a disease in which the body launches an immune reaction when a person consumes gluten, a type of protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

Most patients with both diseases tend to develop asymptomatic celiac disease, but are unaware they are experiencing its symptoms.  This is because they are confusing symptoms with diabetes with those of asymptomatic celiac disease.

Symptoms may include, but are not limited to: Bloating

  • Bloating
  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Anemia
  • Irritability
  • Depression

As a diabetic with celiac disease, you may think that your world has come to an end and you will not be able to eat anything since both diseases require adherence to a strict diet, but that’s not the case.  There are tips you can follow that will help you self-manage both diseases and maintain overall health:

  • Gluten-free foods – Health food stores and most main stream grocery stores now carry gluten-free products. Rice pasta can be used as a substitute for pasta.
  • Follow a whole-food meal plan – A gluten free dinner consisting of a serving of protein (broiled or baked), steamed vegetables, a small serving of brown rice, and a small piece of fruit for dessert can small piece of fruit for dessert.
  • Watch your blood sugar levels – A diagnosis of celiac disease necessitates what may be a dramatic change in your daily sources of carbohydrates. You may experience variations in your usual blood-sugar patterns, so you will want to be vigilant in testing.
  • Track your calories and carbs – Some gluten-free foods may be calorie and carbohydrate dense. You cannot assume that a sandwich made with gluten-free bread has the same amount of carbohydrates as one made with regular bread.
  • Check nutrition labels of processed foods – All food labels are required to state if the food contains wheat, but keep in mind that wheat-free doesn’t mean gluten-free.
  • Meet with a registered dietician – It can be complicated having two serious diseases that come with different dietary restrictions.

If you or someone you know has celiac disease and type 1 diabetes and would like to speak with a registered dietitian to help self-manage your disease, call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.