Acupuncture for Smoking Cessation

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Trying to stop smoking? Why not try acupuncture! Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese medicine procedure that involves inserting thin needles in the skin in specific parts of the body to improve well-being.

Traditionally used to treat pain and diseases, recent studies suggest that acupuncture is effective as part of an overall strategy in smoking cessation. It eases symptoms of nicotine withdrawl, such as cravings, fatigue and irritability.

If you need help to stop smoking, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486 to make an appointment with a counselor.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

At What Age Should Kids Walk To School Alone?

 

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Parents make a lot of difficult decisions regarding the safety of their children, but one of the most debated is at what age should you let your child walk to school alone?

Experts agree there is no one perfect age for when kids can walk or bike to school without an adult. Children should have good cognitive and reasoning skills, as well as the ability to follow directions.  The general consensus seems to be that 5-year-olds are too young, 6- and 7-year-olds should walk in a group and that by age 10 most kids are ready.

Your child could walk to school as early as first grade if the route is easy. You should base your decision on the distance to school, the availability of sidewalks, and how safe your neighborhood and surrounding streets are.  If you don’t think your child’s ready to walk to school alone yet, organize a Walking School Bus. It can be a fun compromise for your child and other kids who live nearby.

Before your child heads off to school by themselves (or with friends), here are a few safety precautions you should take:

. Never let a child under age 10 cross the street alone.

. Teach your child to recognize and obey traffic signal, pavement markings, and to always look both ways before crossing.

. Choose the safest route between home and school and practice walking it with your child until he/she can demonstrate traffic-safety awareness.

. Stick to well-traveled streets, use the same route every day and avoid shortcuts through wooded areas, parking lots or alleys.

. Carry backpacks and bags close to their body, not dangling by the straps.

. Put a wallet in an inside coat or front pants pocket, not a back pocket.

. Don’t wear shoes or clothing that restrict movement.

. Cross streets only in crosswalks; never enter streets from between parked cars or from behind shrubbery. Use crosswalks with crossing guards when available.

. Teach your child about good and bad strangers. Don’t speak to strangers; if a stranger approaches, tell a teacher, a school principal, a policeman or another mom with small children. These are good strangers.

. Give your child a cell phone for emergencies and teach them how to use 911.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Smokeless Tobacco and Cancer

We all know the dangers and health risks involved with cigarette smoking, but what about smokeless tobacco?

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Smokeless tobacco, or chewing tobacco, also known as dip, chew, snuff or snus, is tobacco that is not burned, but instead chewed or sucked in the mouth then the tobacco juices are spit out.  Nicotine in the tobacco is absorbed through the lining of the mouth.

People on many continents, including North America, northern Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa, have a long history of using smokeless tobacco products.

According to the National Cancer Institute, at least 28 chemicals in smokeless tobacco have been found to cause cancer, especially nitrosamines, which are formed during the growing, curing, fermenting, and aging of tobacco, polonium–210 (a radioactive element found in tobacco fertilizer) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

Users of smokeless tobacco absorb the addictive ingredient nicotine through the mouth tissues directly into the blood and brain. Nicotine continues to be absorbed into the bloodstream for much longer than for smokers

Smokeless tobacco causes oral cancer, esophageal cancer, and pancreatic cancer, and puts the user at risk for heart disease, gum disease, and oral lesions. There is no safe form of tobacco. Flushing Hospital Medical Center encourages you to quit today. For help with smoking cessation visit www.cdc.gov/tobacco for a list of resources near you.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#MotivatedMonday: Binge Watching and Exercise

 

ThinkstockPhotos-103801447With the weather getting colder and the days getting shorter, snuggling up on the bed or couch and binge watching your favorite TV shows or movies is becoming more appealing.  However, long hours of inactivity can increase health risks for obesity, heart disease, and even osteoporosis.

 

Here are a few tips to stay active while marathoning:

  1. Jumping Jacks – try doing multiple sets during breaks or even while you watch.
  2. Side lying leg lifts — While lying on your side, stack your legs and bring them out to a 45 degree angle in front of your body. Flex your feet and lift your top leg slightly higher than you hip and then down. Try doing multiple sets of 20 until you reach 100.
  3. Sit ups – Lay on the floor and do multiple sets of sit ups until you reach 100.
  4. Chair poses – For all over toning stand with your feet together and big toes touching. Inhale and lift your arms up until they are perpendicular to the floor. Exhale and sit your hips back down like you’re about to sit in an invisible chair. Bring your thighs as close to parallel with the floor as you can. Hold for 8 to 10 breaths.
  5. Upper back stretches — Improve your posture and ease tension while sitting on your sofa. Sit with a straight back, stomach held in and feet flat on the floor. Grab your left wrist with your right hand and pull your left wrist to the right until you feel a nice stretch. Keep the stretch for 30 seconds then repeat using the opposite hand.
  6. Free weights — invest in some free weights and vary some arm exercises like curls or the tricep push. Try low weight and high reps for toning.

No matter how long you binge watch, or how frequently, be sure that you always take the time to exercise for a healthier, happier you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bicycle Safety

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According to the New York City Department of Transportation, commuter cycling increased 262% in New York City from 2000 to 2010. Cycling is certainly a healthy, and environmentally friendly way to get around, but what are the rules of the road for cyclists?

Did you know that cyclists are subject to the same regulations as drivers of motor vehicles?

Here are some additional rules cyclists must follow, as well as safety tips for riders:

.  Ride in the street, not on the sidewalks (unless rider is age 12 or younger and the bicycle’s wheels are less than 26 inches in diameter).

.  Ride with traffic, not against it. Do not weave in and out of traffic.

.  Stop at red lights and stop signs and obey all traffic signals, signs and pavement markings.

.  Use marked bike lanes or paths when available. Bicycling is permitted on all main and local streets throughout the City, even when no designated route exists.

. When riding at night, use a white headlight and a red taillight, as well as a bell or horn and reflectors.

.  Look, signal and look again before changing lanes or making a turn. Establish eye contact with drivers. Seeing a driver is often not enough. Make sure drivers see you before executing a turn or riding in front of a turning car.

.  Watch out for car doors. Be prepared for the possibility that a car door may be opened in your path.

.  Use your bell. It alerts drivers, pedestrians and other cyclists to your presence, and it is required by law.

.  Don’t wear earphones. By law you may wear one earbud, but keeping your ears clear is a much safer choice.

.  Wear a helmet. While, helmets are required by law for children age 13 or younger and working cyclists, they are a good idea for cyclists of all ages.

For more information on bicycle safety, go to NYC.gov

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Prenatal Exercise

prenatal exerciseDon’t be afraid to exercise if you are pregnant. As long as you are feeling well, and your doctor approves, it is okay to do some moderate exercising during pregnancy. Exercising is recommended because inactivity is not good for pregnant women. It can lead to excess weight gain, elevated blood pressure, frequent aches and pains, and higher risk of C-sections.

The benefits of exercising during pregnancy include:

• Better posture
• Improved circulation
• Less fatigue and more energy
• Strengthens muscles
• Helps prevent back pain

Exercising during pregnancy has to be done carefully and should be done in moderation. You don’t want to injure your body or your developing fetus. It is advisable to work with an instructor who has experience working with pregnant women. Definitely do not exercise if you are experiencing any type of discomfort, shortness of breath, or become overheated.

One of the easiest ways to start exercising during pregnancy is by simply walking. It is important to always wear shoes that are comfortable and loose fitting clothing. Walking should be done on a level surface at the beginning and slowly increase the distance and duration. For added benefit, you can try carrying light weights, increasing your speed, and walking up and down hills. Swimming is an excellent form of exercise and low or non-impact aerobics are also usually safe.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Strange But True — The Walking Dead?

walking dead picimagesCALSOJ7RDo zombies really exist? Walking Corpse Syndrome (also known as Cotard’s Syndrome) is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder in which the afflicted person believe he or she is dead, missing their soul, organs, blood or other body parts, and being in a state of existence denial. Conversely, some patients may have delusions of immortality.

For people with this condition, entertainment like cable TV’s “The Walking Dead” may be too close for comfort.

Studies indicate that the disease is more prevalent in older patients and women with depression.  It is also more likely to occur in patients with disorders such as:

  • Schizophrenia
  • Bipolar disorders
  • Brain injury
  • Brain atrophy
  • Seizure disorders
  • Depression
  • Brain tumors
  • Stroke
  • Migraine

Lesions in the frontal and temporal regions (front and sides) of the right hemisphere of the brain have been associated with the disease. However, Cotard’s Syndrome is so rare that it is difficult to pinpoint the mechanisms that cause it.

Tests are used to diagnose associated diseases and rule out other conditions.  Current treatment for Cotard’s Syndrome involves medication with antidepressants, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Electroconvulsive therapy, in combination with medication, has been reported to be more effective than medications alone.

Fortunately, patients with Cotard’s Syndrome can experience a complete recovery, even in severe cases.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#TBT — The History of Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI

Physicians often send patients for Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI’s to help them diagnose certain medical conditions, but do you know what an MRI is?

mri-300x200In 1977 the first human scan was performed in a prototype MRI machine. An MRI is a computerized map of harmless radio signals emitted by the human body. MRI works by creating a strong magnetic field where protons in the nucleus of the hydrogen atoms are magnetized. It is excellent for viewing soft tissue and seeing any defects that may be present.

The rotating magnetic field was discovered by Nikola Tesla in 1882. This eventually led to the definition of the Tesla Unit which describes the strength of a magnetic field. MRI machines, which were developed almost a century later, are calibrated in Tesla Units. The stronger the magnetic field, the stronger the amount of radio signals that are given off by the body’s atoms. The stronger the radio signal will lead to a better quality of the MRI image.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Radiology offers a wide variety of state-of-the-art diagnostic and specialty services performed by Board Certified, Fellowship trained, Radiologists, and highly trained licensed and registered Technologists.To schedule an appointment for a MRI test or for more information about the MRI, please call 718-670-8851.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is There Medicinal Power in Herbs? Bay Leaf Tea

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There are many benefits of drinking bay leaf tea. Some of the most widely known benefits are:

1.  Bay leaves are a rich source of vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Also regular inclusion of bay leaves in meals promotes general health.

2.  They have been proven to be useful in the treatment of migraines.

3.  Bay Leaf contains enzymes that help to breakdown proteins and digest food faster, helping to calm indigestion.

Recipe for Bay Leaf

  •  16 oz water
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Juice of 1 large or 2 smaller lemons
  1. Place ingredients, together, in a pot and bring to a boil.
  2. Drink, after it cools down

A hot cup of bay leaf tea can be very comforting. The aromatic fragrance that the leaves release is calming and the essence of the spiced tea makes bay leaf tea delicious.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

MYTH OR FACT: Can people really cry tears of blood?

 

FACT: Tears of blood, or haemolactia, is an extremely rare condition described as bleeding from the eyes. Because it is so rare, not much is known about the condition, but bleeding from the eye could a sign of tumors in the lacrimal sac, located in the groove between your nose and eye socket. Infection of the sac, bacterial conjunctivitis, a ruptured capillary of the eye lid or any other eye vein , possible due to high blood pressure, can also be a cause.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.