Breastfeeding and Going Back to Work

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding and working is a challenge you can overcome.

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Here are some suggestions designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier:

1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.

2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.

3. Ask if your company provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.

4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care department at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy?

Finding it difficult to lose weight through dieting and exercise? If you are obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher, or at least 100 pounds overweight, you might be considering weight loss surgery, like a vertical sleeve gastrectomy.

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During vertical sleeve gastrectomy surgery, the surgeon removes a large portion of your stomach. The new, smaller stomach is about the size and shape of a banana, limiting the amount you can eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food.

This surgery is performed under general anesthesia. This type of surgery, called laparoscopic surgery, is usually done using a tiny camera called a laproscope that is placed in your belly. The camera is connected to a video monitor in the operating room that allows the surgeon to see inside your belly and remove most of your stomach.

Vertical sleeve gastrectomy is not a quick fix for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle, but you still have work to do.  To lose weight and avoid complications from the procedure, you will need to follow strict exercise and eating guidelines given to you by your doctor and dietitian.  This procedure cannot be reversed once it has been done.

Your surgeon will ask you to have a complete physical exam, blood and other tests, as well as an ultrasound of your gallbladder to make sure you are healthy enough for surgery.  It is also necessary to visit with other health care providers to make sure any medical problems you may have, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart or lung problems, are under control before surgery. Quitting smoking is also required before surgery.

Counseling is recommended prior to surgery to make sure you are emotionally ready for such a major lifestyle change. Classes are available to help you learn what happens during the surgery, what you should expect afterward, and what risks or problems may occur afterward.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a full range of bariatric surgery options performed by doctors using the minimally invasive da Vinci robotic system. Bariatric surgery performed using the robot allows for faster healing time, less scarring, and shorter hospital stays. Please call 718-670-8908 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do You Have Fibroids?

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About 20-80 percent of women develop uterine fibroids by the time they reach age 50. Fibroids are muscular tumors that grow in the wall of the uterus and are almost always benign (not cancerous). Fibroids can grow as a single tumor, or there can be many of them in the uterus ranging in size from as small as an apple seed to as big as a grapefruit.

Not all women with fibroids have symptoms. Some have heavy bleeding (which may cause anemia), painful periods, pain during sex or lower back pain. Some experience a feeling of fullness in the pelvic area, rectal pressure or frequent urination due to fibroid pressure on the bladder. Large fibroids may cause the abdomen to swell, making a woman look pregnant.

No one knows what causes fibroids. Risk factors for developing fibroids include age, family history, ethnicity, and obesity. Researchers suspect a combination of hormones, like high levels of estrogen and progesterone, may cause them to grow or shrink. For example, they grow rapidly during pregnancy when hormone levels are high, and shrink when anti-hormone medication is used. They also stop growing or shrink once a woman reaches menopause.

Your gynecologist will check during your regular exams to see if you have fibroids. Talk with your doctor about the best way to treat your fibroids which may include medication or surgery. If you have fibroids, but don’t have any symptoms, you may not need treatment.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health uses the latest techniques and equipment, such as ultrasonography, color doppler, laser and laparoscopic surgery.  We also offer minimally invasive robotic procedures using the da Vinci robotic system. Fibroid surgery performed using the robot allows for faster healing time, less scarring and shorter hospital stays.

For an appointment, please contact the Ambulatory Care Department at 718-670-5486.

Join us on Facebook.com/FlushingHospital or follow us on Twitter @FHMC_NYC for more tips on fitness and health.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Many Drinks Are Too Many?

April is Alcohol Awareness Month. Poll question: How many drinks per week are too many?

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Answer: According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: men should not exceed four drinks per day or a total of 14 per week and women should not to exceed three drinks a day or a total of seven per week.

When following these guidelines here are some factors to consider:

.Portion size: Standard portions in the United States include 12-ounces of beer, 8-ounces of malt liquor, 5-ounces of wine and 1.5-ounces or a “shot” of 80-proof distilled spirits or liquor.

.Alcohol content: There are differences in alcohol percentages between red and white wines, as well as between light beers and lagers.

.Gender: Women have less body water than men and hence retain a higher blood-alcohol concentration than men from a single drink.

.Food:  An empty stomach speeds up alcohol absorption. Food slows absorption rates in men and women.

Remember, everyone metabolizes alcohol differently and moderation is key. Make smart choices when enjoying dinner or a night out with friends and NEVER drink and drive.

If you think you have a problem with alcohol, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Addiction Treatment Division at 718- 670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Dangers of Texting While Driving

April is National Distracted Driving Awareness month. Did you know that motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are one of the leading causes of death in the United States? Each year, nearly 2.5 million Americans are treated in hospital emergency departments as a result of an MVA.  The numbers are staggering, however, most vehicle-related injuries are avoidable.

The most important tip is to stay focused on the road and avoid becoming a “distracted driver.”

Each day, more than 15 people are killed in accidents involving a distracted driver, a driver engaged in another activity that distracts them while driving.  Distractions can impair a driver in three ways:

• Visually  – Forcing the driver to take his or her eyes off the road
• Manually – Forcing the driver to take his or her hands off of the steering wheel
• Cognitively – Forcing the driver to take his or her mind off of driving while they are doing something else

While there are many forms of distractions for drivers, the type that has seen the largest increase in occurrences is texting while driving.  Texting while driving is especially dangerous because it impairs the driver’s visual, manual, and cognitive abilities. In a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control, 31% of U.S. drivers ages 18-64 reported texting or emailing while driving at least once within the 30 days before they were surveyed.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center is well aware of the growing trend involving injuries and fatalities associated with texting and driving and they want to warn drivers on the road to resist the urge to text OMG or LOL or you might end up DOA!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Gummy Vitamins Good for my Child?

Gummy vitamins contain important nutrients to maintain a child’s health, but they can be damaging to your child’s teeth. Similar to candy, gummy vitamins stick to the grooves of your child’s teeth and can cause cavities.

Although your child may brush their teeth the recommended two times per day, toothbrush bristles cannot reach the deepest grooves of the back molars. Sticky sugar particles can remain embedded in the grooves, causing cavities when not brushed properly.

Try switching to traditional chewable tablets if you’re giving your child gummy vitamins. Before the age of two years, speak with your children’s pediatrician or pediatric dentist about a liquid vitamin.

If you believe your child has developed a cavity, ask at your child’s next dental visit or call The Dental Department at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5521 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Smoking Affects Your Good Looks

 

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Smoking is harmful to your body; the toxins found in tobacco and cigarettes can damage your body from the inside out. The smoke from cigarettes contains 7,000 hazardous chemicals which may lead to lung cancer, asthma, complications with diabetes and damage to your heart. These chemicals are also known to wreak havoc on your physical appearance.

Here are some of the ways smoking can ruin your good looks:

.Bags under the eyes-Smokers are four times as likely to have bags under the eyes. Nicotine slows the circulation of blood throughout the body, which in turn affects the flow of circulation around the eyes.
.Dental health-Cigarette smoke can also interfere with the normal function of the cells in the gum, which leads to discoloration of your pearly whites, bad breath and other dental problems.
.Premature wrinkles- Smoking limits circulation and causes deprivation of blood to the tissues that keep the skin supple. Studies show that smokers tend to look older than their peers because the aging process has been accelerated.
.Sagging arms or breasts- Is often a tell-tale sign of a person who has smoked for an extended period of time. It has been discovered that the chemicals in cigarettes destroy collagen and elastin. With the loss of these fibers, the skin will begin to lose its elasticity and strength.
.Yellow nails and fingers- Nicotine can stain fingers and nails making them brown or yellow in color.
.Hair loss- Studies show that smoking can accelerate hair loss. The circulation of blood flowing to the hair follicles is hampered, this disrupts the normal growth cycle of hair.

The damages caused by smoking affect the body both internally and externally. Some of the effects are immediate and can be seen instantly or some may develop over time. However, several of these conditions can be reversed once a person stops smoking.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center encourages you to quit today. For help with smoking cessation visit www.cdc.gov/tobacco for a list of resources near you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Celebrates 100th Robotic Surgery

Pictured from L to R: Dr Alejandro Alcaide , Dr  Roberto Cantu Jr. , Nixon Medrick, Dr Sanjeev Rajpal, Dr Frederick Gulmi, Danielle Kronfeld

Pictured from L to R: Dr Alejandro Alcaide , Dr Roberto Cantu Jr. , Nixon Medrick, Dr Sanjeev Rajpal, Dr Frederick Gulmi, Danielle Kronfeld

Flushing Hospital Medical Center celebrates 100 successful robotic surgery cases since adding the da Vinci robot to its team in October 2014. Since its inception surgeons have used robotic technology in a wide variety of procedures with great success. Surgery performed with the assistance of the da Vinci surgical system can offer several benefits to patients such as shorter hospital stays, minimal scarring and less pain.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes-Friendly Dessert: Carrot Cake with Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting

Eating healthful meals is an essential part of managing diabetes. If you suffer from diabetes,or just crave a healthy dessert, this carrot cake recipe is sure to please. Recipe courtesy of Diabetic Living Online.

Carrot Cake with Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup flax seed meal
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups finely* shredded carrot (about 6 medium)
  • 1 cup refrigerated or frozen egg product, thawed, or 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar or sugar substitute blend** equivalent to 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar or brown sugar substitute blend** equivalent to 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 1 recipe Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting
  • Coarsely shredded carrot (optional)
 Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease and lightly flour two 8×1-1/2- or 9×1-1/2-inch round cake pans; line bottom of pans with waxed paper. Grease and lightly flour the waxed paper and the sides of the pans. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, stir together flour, flax seed meal, baking powder, pumpkin pie spice, baking soda, and salt; set aside. In another large bowl, combine finely shredded carrot, eggs, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and oil. Add egg mixture all at once to flour mixture. Stir until combined. Divide batter evenly among prepared pans, spreading evenly.
  3. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes for 8-inch pans, 20 to 25 minutes for 9-inch pans, or until a toothpick inserted near centers of the cakes comes out clean. Cool cakes in pans on wire racks for 10 minutes. Invert cakes onto wire racks. Cool completely.
  4. Place one cooled cake layer on a serving platter. Top with half of the Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting. Place the second cake layer atop the frosting; spread with the remaining frosting. If desired, garnish with coarsely shredded carrot. Makes 14 to 16 servings.
 Tip
  • * Be sure to finely shred the carrots to prevent them from sinking to the bottom of the pan during baking.
  • **Sugar Substitutes: Choose Splenda® Sugar Blend for Baking to substitute for the granulated sugar and Splenda® Brown Sugar Baking Blend to substitute for the brown sugar. Follow package directions to use product amount equivalent to 1/2 cup granulated and 1/2 cup brown sugar.
  • **Sugar Substitutes: PER SERVING WITH SUBSTITUTE: same as above, except 231 cal., 25 g carb., 186 mg sodium. Daily values: 3% calcium. Exchanges: 1.5 other carb. Carb choices: 1.5

Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting ingredients:

  • 2 ounces softened reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchatel)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups frozen light whipped dessert topping
 Directions
  1. In a medium bowl, beat reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchatel) with an electric mixer on medium to high speed until smooth. Beat in vanilla. Gradually add powdered sugar, beating until smooth. Thaw 1-1/2 cups frozen light whipped dessert topping. Fold about 1/2 cup of the topping into the cream cheese mixture to lighten. Fold in the remaining whipped topping. Makes about 1-3/4 cups.
Makes 14-16 servings
NUTRITION FACTS PER SERVING: 254 cal., 11 g total fat (2 g sat. fat), 3 mg chol., 188 mg sodium, 34 g carb. (3 g fiber, 19 g sugars), 5 g pro.
Diabetic Exchanges
Other Carb (d.e): 2; Fat (d.e): 2;

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#TBT Flushing Hospital Medical Center 1910

It’s Throwback Thursday! Enjoy a rare photo of Flushing Hospital from 1910.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.