Slow Changes Can Lead to Wellness

Rear view of young hiking couple walking through field

When looking for a routine that can bring wellness to your entire being, you don’t have to climb a mountain in Tibet or strip away all food you love. Experts say that the best way to bring a wellness routine into your life is through a series of small changes that will gradually make a difference.

Changes such as:
◾Meditation – Take a moment in the morning to meditate. It will set the tone for the day and clear your head to prepare for what the day may bring.
◾Music – Play calming music. The body’s internal rhythms sync with the rhythms of music. By focusing on the music and its melody, you will start to feel your breathing and heart rate begin to slow down, bringing you to a much calmer place
◾Plan a trip – According to research, happiness spikes when planning a trip.
ut down your smartphone – When the impulse to pick up your phone comes, and you resist it, you may feel a wave of anxiety. Don’t panic! Breath through the anxiety and you will see that there is calm that will follow.
◾Breathe deeply – Sit in a comfortable place, breathe naturally and settle your attention on your breath. With each inhale and exhale, mentally repeat the words “in” and “out.” Even if you mind wanders, don’t get distracted; just bring your attention back to your breathing.
◾Don’t check your email when you first wake up – When you wake, sit silently and allow your mind to wander. Take 10 minutes to just center yourself before you start your day.
◾Walk – Use part of your lunch break to take a walk. This activity will aid with digestion, keep you active and relieve stress.

No one likes change and it rarely comes easy. That’s why slowly incorporating small steps toward your goals overtime can lead to huge changes in the long run.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Memory Loss

Some degree of memory loss is common as people get older. It is not uncommon to forget momentarily where you left your car keys, your eyeglasses or the name of someone you know.  It is when these occurrences become more frequent that it may indicate a serious problem. Severe memory loss may be related to dementia which indicates that there are problems with reasoning, judgment, and progressively worsening memory. These symptoms may eventually inhibit a person’s ability to work and function independently.
There can be many causes of memory loss. These include:
• Alcohol, tobacco and drug use
• Vitamin B-12 deficiency
• Sleep deprivation
• Depression and stress
• Medications some examples being antidepressants, antihistamines, anti-anxiety, tranquilizers, sleeping pills pain medication
• Head injury
• Stroke
• HIV
• Syphilis
The treatment for memory loss will depend on what is causing it. If it is due to taking certain medications than alternative treatment may be the way to treat a condition.  The first step in diagnosing the cause of memory loss will be a general physical exam by a physician that will include questions and the ability to answer them appropriately.  If you think that you are experiencing memory loss and would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

Talking with Grandma

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Power of Positive Thinking

positivethinking

According to the Mayo Clinic, positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health.

Try these morning affirmations and get your day started right:

  • Today, I will think pure and positive thoughts
  • Today, I release the past and move into the present
  • Today, I choose to have joy
  • Today, I choose peace
  • Today, I realize that I am worthy of good things
  • Today, I begin to make healthy choices for my body, mind and soul
  • Today, I claim that the healthier I live my life, the better my life will be
  • Today, I like who I am

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are the Keys to Successful Aging?

Understanding Physical and Mental Health: Depression
Ira Frankel, PhD, LCSW, Administrator of Psychiatry and Addiction Services

“Just as long as we have our health,” is something that I’ve said and have heard others say very frequently in the past few months. And, by health, we mean both physical and mental health.

Portrait of a senior man in a tuxedo showing the thumbs up

In a very basic way, health can be thought of as the absence of disease. A reason that our doctors ask us how we’re feeling when we go to see him or her is because he or she wants to know about our comfort or our absence of pain or trouble. Each one of us knows best what our physical or mental pain or trouble consists of because we feel it directly.

Another way to think of the issue of health is to describe the path to achieve it over the long course of our lives. Studies1 have shown that a path to health is achieved with a behavioral prescription for successful aging that includes diet, exercise, the pursuit of mental challenges, self-efficacy, and social support. The more we are able to follow this behavioral prescription, the more we will be free from physical or mental pain or trouble.

Let’s look at this a little more closely. Most of us already know that if we maintain a healthy diet and exercise frequently, then we will tend to be healthier. In fact, exercise is now considered a “magic bullet” in modern medicine. But, maintaining a good diet and exercising frequently is a mental challenge of self-mastery. And, most of us know how difficult it is to master ourselves to maintain both activities. There are many other mental challenges. For example, each one of us is a mental challenge to other people. In fact, getting along with others is one of the most difficult mental challenges that we will ever have to face.

The fourth successful aging ingredient is self-efficacy. Those of us who believe that we can achieve a particular goal, for example, health and longevity, will continue to do the things, such as diet, exercise, and the pursuit of mental challenges, which will help us achieve the goal. We can build up self-efficacy by taking small, rather than giant steps, towards diet, exercise, and the pursuit of mental challenges

The final successful aging ingredient is social support. If we help each other take the steps described in the previous paragraphs, then each one of us will be more likely to feel at ease, that is, without disease, successfully age, and live longer.

Self-mastery is necessary for both physical and mental health. The behavioral prescription for successful aging in the previous paragraphs are just a general outline of self-mastery steps. Self-mastery is a mental challenge.

Many things get in the way of self-mastery. One of these things is depression. If we are depressed, then we have a hard time maintaining a good diet, exercising as we should, thinking well about self-mastery, feeling self-efficacy, or being with and getting along with other people. There is a fairly simple way to ask ourselves whether we are depressed. It is called the PHQ-2, which stands for the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 because it has two questions.

Ask yourself: Over the past 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following symptoms: 1) Little interest or pleasure in doing things; and, 2) Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless. Answers are either (0) not at all, (1) several days, (2) more than half the days, or (3) nearly every day. Bring your answers to your primary care doctor the next time you see him or her.

Taking the self-mastery steps towards successful aging and longevity is a main task of modern medicine. Taking the self-mastery steps is a very important mental challenge. If you are experiencing any difficulties taking these steps, such as depression or any other difficulty on your path to ease and comfort, then speak with your primary care doctor in the community or one at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-8939

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Small Changes = Big Benefits

Seniors exercising with dumbbells in a health club

When looking for a routine that can bring wellness to your entire being, you don’t have to climb a mountain in Tibet or strip away all food you love.  Experts say that the best way to bring a wellness routine into your life is through a series of small changes that will gradually make a difference.

Changes such as:

  • Meditation – Take a moment in the morning to meditate.  It will set the tone for the day and clear your head to prepare for what the day may bring.
  • Music – Play calming music.  The body’s internal rhythms sync with the rhythms of music. By focusing on the music and its melody, you will start to feel your breathing and heart rate begin to slow down, bringing you to a much calmer place
  • Plan a trip – According to research, happiness spikes when planning a trip.
  • Put down your smartphone – When the impulse to pick up your phone comes, and you resist it, you may feel a wave of anxiety.  Don’t panic! Breath through the anxiety and you will see that there is calm that will follow.
  • Breathe deeply – Sit in a comfortable place, breathe naturally and settle your attention on your breath.  With each inhale and exhale, mentally repeat the words “in” and “out.”  Even if you mind wanders, don’t get distracted; just bring your attention back to your breathing.
  • Don’t check your email when you first wake up – When you wake, sit silently and allow your mind to wander. Take 10 minutes to just center yourself before you start your day.
  • Walk – Use part of your lunch break to take a walk.  This activity will aid with digestion, keep you active and relieve stress.

No one likes change and it rarely comes easy.  That’s why slowly incorporating small steps toward your goals overtime can lead to huge changes in the long run.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Supports World Suicide Prevention Day

Suicide affects millions; over 800,000 people take their lives each year, and the number of people who attempt suicide is twenty five times that amount. In addition to the lives lost, suicide also affects the many friends and family members devastated by the loss of their loved one.

Suicide is largely preventable though. Through education and awareness, we can get those people who are contemplating suicide the help they need.

Educational and Creative composition with the message Stop Suicide

One of the best tools in preventing suicide is to know the risk factors. Over 90% of people who attempt suicide live with depression or another mental disorder. Alcohol or substance abuse is often a contributing factor. Adverse reactions to traumatic events or stress can also lead to someone wanting to take their own life.

Other risk factors for suicide include:
• Family history of mental disorder or substance abuse
• Family history of suicide
• Family violence
• Physical or sexual abuse
• Keeping firearms in the home
• Chronic physical illness, including chronic pain
• Exposure to the suicidal behavior of others

Someone who is considering suicide usually displays certain behaviors. Loved ones should look for the following warning signs:

Always talking or thinking about death
Trouble sleeping and eating — that gets worse over time
Displaying reckless behavior that could result in death, such as driving fast or running red lights
Losing interest in things one used to care about
Making comments about being hopeless, helpless, or worthless
Talking about suicide or killing one’s self
Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

If someone you know appears to be contemplating suicide, take the issue seriously. Let the person know that you care and understand and are listening and attempt to get them immediate help from a health care professional.

If your loved one appears to be in imminent danger of committing suicide, do not leave him or her alone. Remove any weapons or drugs he or she could use. Accompany him or her to the nearest emergency room or call 911.

September 10 has been designated World Suicide Prevention Day. Many organizations from around the world have joined this cause. Flushing Hospital’s supports their efforts and the hospital’s Department of Psychiatry offers many inpatient and outpatient services to help those in need.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Midlife Crisis or Depression?

midlife crisis

The idea of a “midlife crisis” in popular culture is when you do outrageous, impractical things such as straying from your marriage, buying sports cars or impulsively quitting you job.

A midlife crisis is better known as a midlife transition to mental health experts, who say this time in a person’s life is sometimes accompanied by depression.

The key is to realize when your transition is developing into depression.

Some signs that your midlife transition may be rooted in depression are:

  • Extreme change in eating habits
  • Consistently fatigued and exhausted
  • Change in sleeping patterns
  • A feeling of hopelessness, guilt or worthlessness
  • Irritable, restless or unexpected bouts of anger
  • Thoughts or attempts of suicide
  • Decrease or increase in desire and ambition
  • Compulsion for alcohol or drugs
  • Desire for a sexual affair
  • Feeling overwhelmingly trapped by responsibilities, such as
    financial, family and job
  • Consistent desire to run away from responsibilities
  • Doing things out of character that could lead to trouble

Studies have shown that 88% of Americans who are experiencing depression during their midlife transition have reported difficulty at work, home or with otherwise simple social activities.  Unfortunately, only 35% of them had seen a mental health professional for support or treatment.

A midlife transition can be one of the most stress-filled phases in your life’s journey.  Seeking the assistance from a mental health professional during this time can save relationships, finances and other aspects of your life.

If you are experiencing the symptoms of a midlife transitional depression, call for an appointment at the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Mental Health Center.  For more information or to make an appointment, call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Clean House, Clean Mind?

exhausted and tired

Does the secret to escaping an otherwise stressful existence lie at home? When you enter your home it should spark instant relief and joy; it should be a sanctuary from the day’s stressors.  If it isn’t, you have some work to do so that it becomes a retreat from the bustling world around you.

Messes at home can take up mental space.  Thoughts of, “I need to clean the garage, organize my closet, rake the leaves or clean the attic” can hang out in your subconscious mind causing feelings of anxiety, sleepless nights and inadequacy.

Experts profess that by putting your house in order, literally, you can focus on putting your life in order as well.

Here are a few easy ways to help you unclutter your home:

  • Tackle clutter one room at a time – Break down which areas need the most attention and begin to go through the items you’d like to keep and the item’s you’d like to discard. The items did not arrive in a day, so don’t think that you have to purge in one day.
  • Let go of the past – When purging, don’t succumb to taking a trip down memory lane. Look at old photos, prom dresses, letters, report cards, etc. with a critical eye, not a teary one.

After you have looked through your closet, bedroom, garage, attic, etc. and have sorted out the things you want to discard, you will feel a sense of pride and accomplishment.  These feelings can transcend into a positive outlook in other aspects of your life.

Remember, your home should be a sanctuary where you can feel like you have escaped the day and your mind can become unburdened.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Life as a Single Parent

woman juggling fruit

Being a single parent is not easy; it has its own set of challenges.

Couples get together with the very best of intentions, full of hopes and dreams of white picket fences, 2.5 kids.

No one enters into a committed relationship with the intention of uncoupling. Nonetheless, it’s a distressingly common occurrence.

Suddenly, you find yourself a single parent. Even if you have always been an active, involved parent, this is a completely different experience.

In the best of situations, with a support team of grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, friends, etc. you may have bouts of frustration and fatigue.

During these times you will have to push through and step-up. There is no substitution for a parent when dealing with a crying toddler, grumpy daughter or a son who failed to make the last out. These are hurdles you and your children will have to scale together.

Some of the most common ways a single parent can cope with and reduce stress are:

  • Finding a balance – Remember that parenting is about the moment. Take a deep breath and let go of your expectations.
  • Show your love –Praise your child. Give him or her unconditional love and support.
  • Create a routine – Structure, such as regularly scheduled meals and bedtimes help your child know what to expect.
  • Find quality child care – If you need regular child care, look for a qualified caregiver who can provide a safe environment. Do not rely on an older child as your only babysitter and be careful about asking a new friend or partner to watch your child.
  • Set limits – Explain house rules and expectations to your child, such as speaking respectfully and enforce them.
  • Don’t give in to guilt – Don’t blame yourself or spoil your child to try to make up for being a single parent.
  • Make time for yourself – Include physical activity in your daily routine, eat a healthy diet and get plenty of sleep. Make time to enjoy alone time or activities with close friends.
  • Lean on others – It’s okay to join a support group for single parents or seek social services. Call on trusted loved ones, friends and neighbors for help.
  • Stay positive – Be honest with your child if you’re having a difficult time, but remind him or her that things will get better. Try to keep your sense of humor when dealing with everyday challenges.

Mistakes may be made, but with love and the best of intentions, you’ll make it through.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Music to Your Ears – How Music Affects Our Mood

man face silhouette in profile with musical hair

Music has been known to make us smile, excite us, make us dance or bring us to tears.  It can bring back a memory so vividly that we actually feel we are there.

Music can stabilize or have an enhancing effect on our mood, but how does it have this profound power over a person’s emotions?

Maybe because it is a common phenomenon that crosses all boarders of nationality, race and culture.  Music is often used as a tool for arousing feelings and can be far more impactful than language.

Did you know that when we listen to a musical rhythm, our heart can actually begin to synch with it?  Studies have shown that a “major key” will signify cheerful communication to our brain, while a “minor key” can bring on sighs and lamentations. All of this has an effect on the brain, which directs our psyche to feel what’s being communicated to us.

In many instances, music is utilized for treating depressed or anxious patients since the meter, timber, rhythm and pitch of musical arrangements are managed in areas of the brain that deal with emotions and mood.

Although the overall phenomenon still has its certain level of mystery, many people turn to music for a general sense of well-being.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.