BACKPACK = BACKPAIN

backpack-safety

With school in full swing, you may have noticed that your children are carrying, in some cases, more than their body weight in books and supplies affiliated with their school work.  Below is a link with some tips on how to save your childs back from their heavy backpack-

http://www.activebeat.com/your-health/children/back-to-school-backpack-safety-tips/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What You Should Know About Your Premature Baby

rbma_0019Learning that your baby will be arriving early can be overwhelming.  You may grow anxious as you wonder; what happens next?  Having a premature baby does have its challenges; however you can better prepare yourself for what to expect through education.

A baby’s birth is considered premature when they are born before the 37th week of pregnancy. There are different levels of prematurity, each of which is influenced by how early your baby was born.  The levels of prematurity are:

  • Late preterm– Babies born between 34 and 36 weeks of pregnancy
  • Moderately preterm– Babies born between 32 and 34 weeks of pregnancy
  • Very preterm- Babies born at less than 32 weeks of pregnancy
  • Extremely preterm– Babies born at or before 25 weeks of pregnancy

The earlier the birth is the higher the risk of health complications that may affect your baby:  Some of the health complications you could encounter are:

  • Heart problems
  • Respiratory problems
  • Eye disease
  • Intestinal problems

To ensure that your baby receives optimal medical attention after delivery, your team of doctors and nurses will take measures needed to stabilize him or her, which means they may need to:

  • Clear the airways and assist the baby in breathing
  • Regulate and monitor the heart rate. If the baby’s heart rate is exceedingly low, CPR may be performed
  • Transfer the baby to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) if he or she is critically ill

If transferred to the NICU, your baby will receive round-the-clock care. NICU’s are well equipped with the technologies needed to monitor and regulate babies’ health. While in the NICU, be sure to:

  • Form a relationship with caregivers
  • Consult with a lactation consultant to ensure your baby is receiving a fresh supply of milk. Breast milk is best. If you are unable to produce milk, speak with your consultant about receiving donor milk.
  • Become your baby’s health advocate. If you have a concern or have noticed something unusual do not be afraid to speak up
  • Touch your baby as much as allowed
  • Talk to your baby as much as possible; your voice will become familiar and offer comfort

The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Flushing Hospital Medical Center is equipped with the latest technology to care for infants born prematurely or with complications. Even the tiniest babies can be cared for in this unit, which provides specialized testing and the use of modern equipment to manage medical and surgical illnesses. The unit is staffed by highly specialized, Board Certified physicians, certified neonatal nurses, nurse practitioners and social workers. NICU babies continue to receive specialized care after discharge. To learn more about the NICU or Obstetrical Unit at Flushing Hospital, please call the Department of Pediatrics at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Common Core of Common Chores for your Children

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Many parents wrestle with the question of whether or not their children should be required to do chores around the house, and if so, should they be paid for it? There’s really no simple answer.

There are pros and cons to every method of administering an allowance to children. Some think kids should earn money in exchange for doing chores, others believe kids should not be paid for regular contributions that are expected of every family member.  No matter which side you agree with, the point of an allowance is to teach your kids money management skills.

Age appropriate, weekly chores, whether it’s taking out the garbage, emptying the dishwasher, folding clean laundry, walking the dog or light yard work like raking leaves, can help a child develop character. Paying them for their contributions also helps them to develop a respect for earning money.

You might decide on a definite set of weekly chores that your child must complete before being paid, or choose to make a list with a set price per chore and leave it up to them. Bigger tasks like shoveling snow, earn more money, and things like making their bed, earn less.

The method you end up using may not be what you started with, every child is different and the family dynamic and responsibility varies. However you structure it, be flexible. Even if you offer your child an allowance with no strings attached, you shouldn’t hesitate to ask them to do something periodically.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Important is Eating Breakfast?

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How important is eating a healthy breakfast to you? Please share your daily morning routine with us. Do you make the time for a healthy breakfast every morning?

Here’s what we know, breakfast is STILL the most important meal of the day.  It provides you with the energy and nutrients that lead to increased concentration whether in the classroom or at work.

Some benefits of eating a healthy breakfast are:

  • Reduces the chance of developing diabetes
  • Reduces the incidence of heart disease
  • Improves cognitive functions related to memory

Additionally, studies have shown that breakfast can be important in maintaining a healthy body weight.

Translation – Eating breakfast is a smart move!

 

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Does Your Child Have a Vision Problem?

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When a child can’t see well, you might expect them to verbalize their inability to see clearly or complain of headaches, but a child may not say that they are having trouble with their vision because they don’t realize that the world isn’t supposed to be blurry.

Surprisingly, as many as one out of four children in school have vision problems and a large number of children with vision problems go undetected.  When vision impairment goes undiagnosed, their behavior can be misdiagnosed as a learning disability.

Some common signs of vision problems are:

  • Omitting letters, words or phrases
  • Writing that is difficult to read, crowded or inconsistent in size
  • Mistaking words with similar beginnings
  • Miscalling or omitting “small” words
  • Losing place while reading
  • Misaligning digits in columns of numbers
  • Writing uphill or downhill
  • Reversing letters (d for b) or words (saw for was)
  • Rereads or skips words while reading
  • Lip reading or whisper reading to reinforce comprehension

Parents and educators may assume that when a child passes a school vision screening, there is no vision problem.  However, school vision screenings often only test for visual sharpness.  A child who can see 20/20 can still have a vision problem.

If your child exhibits any of the signs and symptoms listed above, you may want to make an appointment for an eye exam with an Ophthalmologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ophthalmology Center.  For an appointment, call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefit of the Annual Physical

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The greatest benefit of an annual physical is knowledge for both you and your physician.  An annual visit establishes a baseline for your personal health.  Armed with this information, your doctor can detect unhealthy trends before they become risk factors.

Nearly one third of the population with a chronic disease is unaware that they have the disease.  According to the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, as many as 100,000 lives could be saved each year by increasing preventive care services.

Health screenings, such as blood glucose and blood pressure tests can easily detect the two most chronic conditions, diabetes and hypertension before they cause serious health issues.  The Centers for Disease Control cites that seven out of every 10 deaths are caused by chronic disease.  Proper management of these conditions can prevent unnecessary hospitalization.

In order to get the most out of your annual physical, take a moment to prepare:

  • Make a list of your health concerns
  • Make a list of all the medications you are taking
  • Get a copy of your medical records and your family medical history

Dozens of Patient Care Specialists, on staff at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, are ready to provide you with your annual check-up.

Flushing Hospital is a certified Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in its Ambulatory Care Center. The Center offers more than 50 outpatient general and specialty services for children adolescents and adults.

Flushing Hospital’s ambulatory care services accepts most major insurances, is centrally located and has convenient patient hours.  Call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foods That Can Be Unsafe for Babies

asian baby eating 497032104The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends the best age for babies to begin eating solid foods is around the age of six months.  Before making the transition to solids, parents should learn the necessary safety measures needed to protect their baby’s health.

The first thing parents have to do before introducing solids to babies is making certain that the infant is able to sit up in a highchair and has good neck and head control.  Additionally, there are certain foods that they should exclude from their child’s menu because their bodies may not be developed enough to digest them. Here is a list of some of these foods:

  • Honey (or foods made with honey): Honey can be harmful to children under the age of one. The spores of the bacteria, Clostridium botulinum, are found in honey and can cause botulism. The symptoms of this illness include; paralysis, shortness of breath, difficulty swallowing, vomiting and abdominal cramps.
  • Cow’s milk: Babies younger than a year old should not consume cow’s milk because it is difficult for them to digest.
  • Smoked or cured meats: Smoked or cured meats such as bacon or bologna usually contain nitrates and other chemicals that can be harmful to babies’ health.
  • Fruit juices: The AAP suggests that fruit juices should be given to infants under the age of six months very minimally or not at all because these juices may contain added sugars. Added sugars are not beneficial for babies’ health and also contain acids that attack enamel in babies’ teeth.
  • Teas: Teas may contain substances such as tannin that can prevent infants from absorbing Iron from food.
  • Salt: Avoid giving infants under 12 months foods that contain too much salt because their kidneys are not fully developed enough to process salt.
  • Fish high in mercury: Some fish such as shark or swordfish are high in mercury and should not be given to babies because they can have a negative effect on their nervous systems.

By following these precautions, parents can safely introduce solid foods to their baby’s diet. Also, keep in mind that if you have a family history of food allergies to consult your pediatrician before giving foods that may cause allergic reactions such as nuts, shellfish or eggs to your child.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Dangers of Co-Sleeping With Your Infant

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New parents have been embracing co-sleeping with their newborns. Proponents claim that it’s an easier and more convenient way to breastfeed and get your baby to sleep through the night with minimal disturbance for either your or your child. However, the American Association of Pediatrics advises against co-sleeping because of the dangers of accidental suffocation and an increased risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

The New York State (NYS) Safe Sleep Initiative has issued new recommendations regarding co-sleeping and asks that you follow the ABCs of safe sleep:

A — Baby should sleep ALONE.

B — Baby should sleep on their BACK.

C — Baby should sleep in a safe CRIB right from the start.

For more information on how best to help your baby get a good night’s rest, check out the NYS Safe Sleep Initiative.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

New Guidelines Recommend NOT Swaddling Your Baby

 

The practice of swaddling infants has grown in popularity over recent years. It is practiced around the world and dates back to Biblical times. Swaddling wraps babies’ arms tightly in a small blanket, such as a receiving blanket, to restrict movement and is said to reduce crying and help babies sleep better.

ThinkstockPhotos-475530867However, according to Maria Smilios, Director of Nursing at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, there are new recommendations regarding swaddling. “We no longer swaddle babies as was advocated in the past,” advises Ms. Smilios. “We leave the babies arms out of the swaddle and one small blanket to cover. Swaddling can cause your baby to overheat and actually increase the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome).”

Follow the ABCs of safe sleep:

A — Baby should sleep ALONE.

B — Baby should sleep on their BACK.

C — Baby should sleep in a safe CRIB right from the start.

For more information on how best to help your baby get a good night’s rest, check out these links on safe sleeping from the New York State (NYS) Safe Sleep Initiative or the NYS Office of Children and Family Services.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The 10 Best Reasons to Breastfeed

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You may have heard it before, but the message is clear- Breastfeeding is beneficial for both baby and mother. If you are still undecided, here are JHMC’s top 10 reasons for choosing breastfeeding as the best form of nutrition for your newborn baby:

  1. It provides nutrients and protection. The first milk, called colostrum, is the perfect first food for babies. Your breast milk’s antibodies help protect baby from the cold and flu and boost his ability to fight off more serious illnesses such as certain cancers like leukemia and Hodgkin’s disease.
  2. It’s always ready & the right temperature. No need to decipher whether your milk is too hot or cold, simply place baby to breast for her feeding.
  3. Creates a greater bond between mother and infant. The skin-to-skin contact you both receive from breastfeeding creates a greater bond since breastfeeding releases the “bonding hormone” oxytocin. The same hormone that’s released when you hug or kiss a loved one.
  4. Provides protection for Mom as well. According to the National Cancer Institute, breastfeeding is associated with a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancers.
  5. Financially beneficial on the family budget. According to La Leche League International, the cost of formula can range anywhere from $134 to $491 per month. That’s $1,608 to $5,892 in one year! Breastfeeding costs nothing because you are producing milk. If you choose to express your milk, many insThinkstockPhotos-524429091urance plans will cover double electric breast pumps.
  6. Breastfed babies are smarter. Various researchers have found a connection between breastfeeding and cognitive development. Studies concluded from IQ scores and other intelligence tests that prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding significantly improves cognitive development.
  7. Helps Mom’s back to their pre-baby shape. With a healthy diet, mom receives the benefits of breastfeeding by burning an average of 500 calories a day, which can help shed those post baby pounds faster than just diet alone.
  8. Lowers the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends breastfeeding for as long as possible to reduce the risk of SIDS. AGerman study published in 2009 found that breastfeeding – either exclusively or partially – is associated with a lower risk of SIDS. The researchers concluded that exclusive breastfeeding at 1 month of age cut the risk of SIDS in half.
  9. Helps with a natural method of birth control. According to the World Health Organization, exclusive breastfeeding is associated with a natural (though not fail-safe) method of birth control offering a 98% protection in the first six months after birth.
  10. Creates confidence in mothers.
    Nursing mothers have reported increased self-confidence and a closer connection to their babies.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.