Rare but True: Sleeping Beauty or Kleine Levin Syndrome

sleeping -493503106Kleine Levin Syndrome (KLS) or Sleeping Beauty Syndrome is a rare neurological condition characterized by recurring periods of excess sleep.  It is estimated that 1000 people worldwide are diagnosed with the disorder.  Adolescent boys are primarily affected but a small percentage of adults and small children (male and female) are also known to suffer from this condition.

KLS symptoms occur in episodes that can last for days, weeks or months.  During each episode, an individual can sleep from 12 to 20 hours a day- only waking to eat and use the bathroom. A person can experience anywhere from two to 12 episodes per year.   Symptoms that occur during wakefulness include:

  • Mood changes
  • Hyper sexuality
  • Hallucinations
  • Disorientation
  • Child-like behavior
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Excessive eating
  • Hypersensitivity to noise and light

These symptoms prevent individuals from leading a normal life. Most are bed ridden and unable to attend work or school. The frequency of KLS episodes tend to decrease with age, there is a possibility that they can recur later in life.

The cause of KLS is unknown but it is believed that it may be the result of a malfunction of the hypothalamus and thalamus (the parts of the brain that regulates sleep, body temperature, sex drive and appetite).

There is no cure for KLS but treatment is available to alleviate symptoms.  Doctors may prescribe stimulants to reduce excessive sleepiness.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefit of the Annual Physical

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The greatest benefit of an annual physical is knowledge for both you and your physician.  An annual visit establishes a baseline for your personal health.  Armed with this information, your doctor can detect unhealthy trends before they become risk factors.

Nearly one third of the population with a chronic disease is unaware that they have the disease.  According to the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, as many as 100,000 lives could be saved each year by increasing preventive care services.

Health screenings, such as blood glucose and blood pressure tests can easily detect the two most chronic conditions, diabetes and hypertension before they cause serious health issues.  The Centers for Disease Control cites that seven out of every 10 deaths are caused by chronic disease.  Proper management of these conditions can prevent unnecessary hospitalization.

In order to get the most out of your annual physical, take a moment to prepare:

  • Make a list of your health concerns
  • Make a list of all the medications you are taking
  • Get a copy of your medical records and your family medical history

Dozens of Patient Care Specialists, on staff at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, are ready to provide you with your annual check-up.

Flushing Hospital is a certified Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in its Ambulatory Care Center. The Center offers more than 50 outpatient general and specialty services for children adolescents and adults.

Flushing Hospital’s ambulatory care services accepts most major insurances, is centrally located and has convenient patient hours.  Call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spring Forward This Weekend with a Good Night’s Sleep

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Daylight savings time begins at 2:00 am on Sunday, March 8. Remember to set your clocks forward and try to get to bed a little earlier to compensate for that lost hour. The food you eat this weekend might be the key to giving you a better night’s sleep.

According to Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 50 to 70 million people in the United States suffer from a wide variety of sleep disorders.

Studies show that certain foods tend to produce a more restful night’s sleep. Foods that you can pick up at any local grocery store that are likely to give you a deeper sleep are:
• Milk
• Turkey
• Honey
• Nuts (such as almonds, walnuts, etc.)
• Kale
• Rice (or other forms of carbohydrates)

The secret to these foods are the vitamins they contain, as well as the hormones they help the brain produce. The old wives’ tale of drinking a warm glass of milk before bedtime is not all that inaccurate. Calcium is a natural sleep inducer, especially when consumed with magnesium, which can be found in bananas. Melatonin is a hormone the brain produces naturally that also greatly contributes to a good night’s sleep. Calcium and magnesium both naturally produce melatonin, a hormone produced by the brain that promotes sleepiness, so eating dairy products, wheat, and beans can all lead to a more restful sleep. Additionally, some proteins, such as lean meats, produce tryptophan, an amino acid that causes sleepiness. Carbohydrates, such as starches and fibers, can also cause fatigue because the body breaks them down into sugars that become glucose, which ultimately becomes blood sugar. Some healthy carbohydrates can be found in whole grain, cereal, and vegetables.

While some foods can help you get a better night’s sleep, other foods and eating habits can reduce your amount of sleep. Some of these include:
• Eating too much or too little
• Caffeine (after lunchtime)
• Fatty foods (fast food, junk food, etc.)
• Eating late at night
• Alcohol (in large doses)

Try to avoid these bad eating habits and replace them with healthy foods that are high in calcium, magnesium, healthy carbohydrates, and protein.

For more health and fitness information, join us on Facebook.com/FlushingHospital or follow us on Twitter @FHMC_NYC

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Your Diet Affect Your Sleep?

food-300x200Do you suffer from a sleep disorder? Your diet may be the key to giving you a better night’s sleep. According to Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 50 to 70 million people in the United States suffer from a wide variety of sleep disorders.

Studies show that certain foods tend to produce a more restful night’s sleep. Foods that you can pick up at any local grocery store that are likely to give you a deeper sleep are:
• Milk
• Turkey
• Honey
• Nuts (such as almonds, walnuts, etc.)
• Kale
• Rice (or other forms of carbohydrates)

The secret to these foods are the vitamins they contain, as well as the hormones they help the brain produce. The old wives’ tale of drinking a warm glass of milk before bedtime is not all that inaccurate. Calcium is a natural sleep inducer, especially when consumed with magnesium, which can be found in bananas. Melatonin is a hormone the brain produces naturally that also greatly contributes to a good night’s sleep. Calcium and magnesium both naturally produce melatonin, a hormone produced by the brain that promotes sleepiness, so eating dairy products, wheat, and beans can all lead to a more restful sleep. Additionally, some proteins, such as lean meats, produce tryptophan, an amino acid that causes sleepiness. Carbohydrates, such as starches and fibers, can also cause fatigue because the body breaks them down into sugars that become glucose, which ultimately becomes blood sugar. Some healthy carbohydrates can be found in whole grain, cereal, and vegetables.

While some foods can help you get a better night’s sleep, other foods and eating habits can reduce your amount of sleep. Some of these include:
• Eating too much or too little
• Caffeine (after lunchtime)
• Fatty foods (fast food, junk food, etc.)
• Eating late at night
• Alcohol (in large doses)

Try to avoid these bad eating habits and replace them with healthy foods that are high in calcium, magnesium, healthy carbohydrates, and protein. If you think you are suffering from a sleep disorder that cannot be helped by your diet, consult a physician for an assessment  or to discuss treatments for possible sleep disorders. To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.