Exercise and Aging

It is never too late to begin a regular fitness routine.  In fact; the United States Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institute on Aging promotes exercise and physical activity as an important factor in healthy aging.

 

Older adults are encouraged to incorporate the following four main types of exercise into their routine:

  1. Strength Exercise
  2. Endurance Exercise
  3. Balance Exercise
  4. Flexibility Exercise

Each type of exercise offers several benefits when performed on an ongoing basis. These benefits can be achieved by doing a variety of physical activities.

  • Strength Exercise- Helps to build muscle and makes them stronger. Stronger muscles can make it possible for older adults to remain independent longer. These benefits may be achieved by participating in activities such as lifting weights or resistance training.
  • Endurance Exercise-Helps to promote a healthy heart rate and improve breathing. This type of exercise focuses on overall fitness as well as keeping the cardiovascular and respiratory systems healthy. Activities such as aerobics, swimming, walking, dancing or jogging are considered endurance exercises.
  • Balance Exercise-Helps to reduce falls, a problem that is common in older adults. This type of exercise focuses on building lower body strength. Activities such as Tai Chi, walking heel to toe and standing on one foot are considered balance exercises.
  • Flexibility Exercise-Helps to stretch muscles, promotes freedom of movement and in some instances improves balance. Examples of flexibility exercises include yoga, Pilates, bending to touch your toes or stretching your arms across your chest.

Before beginning a fitness routine, it is recommended that you speak with your doctor first.  You can work with him or her to create a routine that is compatible with your lifestyle and health. To receive more information about exercise and aging, please visit the National Institute on Aging website https://go4life.nia.nih.gov/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefit of the Annual Physical

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The greatest benefit of an annual physical is knowledge for both you and your physician.  An annual visit establishes a baseline for your personal health.  Armed with this information, your doctor can detect unhealthy trends before they become risk factors.

Nearly one third of the population with a chronic disease is unaware that they have the disease.  According to the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, as many as 100,000 lives could be saved each year by increasing preventive care services.

Health screenings, such as blood glucose and blood pressure tests can easily detect the two most chronic conditions, diabetes and hypertension before they cause serious health issues.  The Centers for Disease Control cites that seven out of every 10 deaths are caused by chronic disease.  Proper management of these conditions can prevent unnecessary hospitalization.

In order to get the most out of your annual physical, take a moment to prepare:

  • Make a list of your health concerns
  • Make a list of all the medications you are taking
  • Get a copy of your medical records and your family medical history

Dozens of Patient Care Specialists, on staff at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, are ready to provide you with your annual check-up.

Flushing Hospital is a certified Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in its Ambulatory Care Center. The Center offers more than 50 outpatient general and specialty services for children adolescents and adults.

Flushing Hospital’s ambulatory care services accepts most major insurances, is centrally located and has convenient patient hours.  Call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fire Safety Tips for The Holiday Season

Fire Safety-494529483We tend to cook and decorate more during the holiday season.  These activities if not exercised with caution and safety can lead to burn injuries, which is one of the most common problems emergency rooms face at this time of year.  Doctors are requesting that people pay close attention to potential hazards that can result in burn injuries and avoid them by following these safety guidelines:

  • Do not leave food unattended on the stove or oven for extended periods of time.
  • Avoid wearing loose garments around flames by the stove or fireside.
  • Keep flammable objects such as pot holders, paper towels or utensils made of wood away from the stove.
  • When buying a real tree make sure that it is green. Also remember to water your tree if it is real – a dry tree is a fire hazard.  If purchasing a synthetic tree be sure to check for a label that reads “fire resistant.”
  • Keep trees away from fire places or radiators.
  • Never leave candles or oil burners unattended.
  • Keep gifts and wrapping paper away from fireplaces.
  • Have chimneys cleaned and inspected each year.
  • Make certain that smoke detectors are working.
  • Always have a fire extinguisher within reach.
  • Do not overload extension cords.
  • Inspect holiday lights to make certain that wires are not cracked or frayed.

Please keep your holiday season safe and accident free by following recommended fire safety guidelines.  For a list of further safety tips please visit the National Fire Protection Association’s website www.NFPA.org .

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Senior Spotlight: Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D?

As we age, the amount of Vitamin D we need to support muscle movement, strong bones and a healthy nervous and immune system increases. The risk of osteoporosis, where bones become fragile and may fracture if one falls, is one consequence of not getting enough calcium and vitamin D over the long term. The amount of vitamin D you need each day depends on your age. Supplements of both vitamin D3 (at 700–800 IU/day) and calcium (500–1,200 mg/day) have been shown to reduce the risk of bone loss and fractures in elderly people aged 62–85 years.

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Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D. Beef liver, mushrooms, egg yolks, and fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel provide small amounts. Fortified foods, including many breakfast cereals and some brands of orange juice, provide most of the vitamin D in American diets.  Almost all of the milk in the United States is fortified with vitamin D, but foods like cheese and ice cream, are usually not.

Sun exposure causes the body to create vitamin D, however this isn’t true in older adults because their kidneys have a harder time converting it. It is also recommended to limit exposure to sunlight to lower the risk for skin cancer.

A simple blood test can be performed to determine your vitamin D levels and your doctor can suggest the best supplement dose for you. Some Americans are vitamin D deficient and almost no one has levels that are too high. Men and women should talk with their health care providers about their needs for vitamin D, and calcium.

Like most dietary supplements, vitamin D may interact or interfere with other medicines or supplements. Tell your doctor, pharmacist, and other health care providers about any dietary supplements and medicines you are taking.

For more health and lifestyle tips, please like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FlushingHospital or follow us on Twitter @FHMC_NYC

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Five Foods to Prevent Osteoporosis

ThinkstockPhotos-451969173Osteoporosis can strike at any age and occurs in both men and women, but it is most common in post-menopausal women. Bone is living tissue that constantly regenerates. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle making you more susceptible to fractures. The most common fractures occur in the hip, wrist or spine.

Medications, healthy diet and weight-bearing exercise can help prevent bone loss or strengthen already weak bones.

May is National Osteoporosis Month. If you suffer from osteoporosis, try adding foods that are good for your bones and rich in nutrients like calcium, vitamins D, C, and K, as well as potassium and magnesium.

.Dairy products — Low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt and cheese that contain calcium and are fortified with vitamin D, as well as fatty fishes like canned sardines, salmon (with bones), mackerel and tuna.

.Potassium — Spinach, beet greens, okra, tomato products, artichokes, plantains, potatoes, sweet potatoes, collard greens and raisins.

.Magnesium — Tomato products, raisins, potatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes, papaya, oranges, orange juice, bananas, plantains and prunes.

.Vitamin C — Red peppers, green peppers, oranges, grapefruits, broccoli, strawberries, Brussels sprout, papaya and pineapples.

.Vitamin K — Vegetables such as kale, mustard greens, turnip greens and Brussels sprout, okra, Chinese cabbage, dandelion greens, and broccoli.

If you think you have osteoporosis, make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling 718-670-5486.

For more health and lifestyle tips, follow us on Twitter @FHMC_NYC and like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/FlushingHospital.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Headphones Bad for Your Hearing?

download (3)Headphones are popular for a multitude of reasons, such as convenience and sound quality, but there is a downside to these devices. According to The Journal of the American Medical Association, the number of teens who have experienced hearing loss has increased by 33% since 1994.  Do you catch yourself blasting music while listening to your headphones for long periods of time? If so, your hearing may be at risk.

Headphones come in a variety of styles, but the two most commonly used are earbuds and around-ear headphones. While around-ear headphones can have negative side effects, earbuds are the more dangerous because they are inserted directly into your ears, providing an uninterrupted route for the music to travel through your ear and straight to your eardrum. When sound enters the ear, the eardrum vibrates. These vibrations travel to the cochlea, where fluid carries them to fine hairs that trigger the auditory nerve fibers, which travel to the brain. When a sound is too loud, the hairs can become damaged, causing permanent hearing loss.

Noise is damaging at about 85 decibels, or the volume of a hair dryer. People who tend to play music up to 110-120 decibels over a long period of time while using earbuds, which increases the sound by 7-9 decibels, can experience a significant amount of hearing loss.

Want to avoid further hearing loss? Try some of these helpful tips:
• Listen to your music for no longer than an hour and no louder than 60% of volume.
• Purchase around-ear headphones with noise-cancelling technology so you can avoid blasting music and prevent music from having direct contact with your eardrum.
• Remove earwax. Earwax builds up every time you push earbuds into your ear canal, so make sure you gently clean it out to prevent hearing loss, discomfort and infection.

If you’re experiencing hearing loss, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center to schedule an appointment with an ENT at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.