What Could Wrist Pain be Telling You ?

Wrist pain

Wrist pain

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is characterized by numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand caused by pressure exerted on a major nerve and tendons in the wrist. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway on the palm side of the wrist through which passes the median nerve and these tendons.  It usually starts gradually with numbness in the thumb, index and middle fingers that at first may appear to come and go and then as it progressively worsens, remains constant. Four out of the five fingers will eventually be affected, the little finger is exempt. It generally affects women more frequently than men.
Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome include:
• Tingling or numbness of the thumb, index finger and middle fingers
• Weakness of the hand with difficulty holding on to objects
Compression of the median nerve can be caused by a few different factors. Some people have naturally occurring smaller carpal tunnels which can lead to increased likely hood of damage. Any damage to that area of the wrist can cause a problem. A previous wrist fracture or anything that may cause swelling in that area can lead to the problem developing. In addition, there are certain health related issues such as diabetes, hypothyroidism, and arthritis which can be associated with this condition.
Temporary relief from the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome can be addressed  by:
• taking quick breaks from repetitive activities of the hand
• rotate your wrists and stretch your palms and fingers
• avoid sleeping on your hands and wrists
• ultrasound therapy which makes the area of the wrist warm and more flexible

Treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome really depends on what the cause is and how severe it has become.  If symptoms appear, never wait too long before seeking treatment options as this can lead to permanent damage. Some simple remedies include stopping any activity that may be compressing the nerve, putting ice on the wrist for 10 – 15 minutes once or twice an hour, taking anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling, and wearing a night splint to take the pressure off of the nerve. Some cases can be helped with injections of corticosteroids. When the condition is really severe, surgical intervention may be required.
If you are experiencing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and would like to be treated by a orthopedic physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of the Total Hip Replacement

One of the most common orthopedic procedures performed today is a total hip replacement (THA) .  This procedure is often suggested for patients who have extensive deterioration of the hip joint and whose quality of life is suffering. It was first developed in 1891 by a German physician, Themistocles Gluck, who described using ivory to replace the femoral heads. Early in the 20th century surgeons experimented with different types of tissues as a way of smoothing out deteriorating articular hip surfaces. Some of these tissues that were used were skin, and pig bladder submucosa.
In 1925 an American surgeon, Marius Smith-Petersen, first used hollowed out glass placed over the femoral head. Later on this same surgeon started to experiment with stainless steel.  In the early 1960’s, Sir John Charmley, an orthopedic surgeon in England, developed a hip replacement that uses three components: a stainless steel femoral head, a polyethylene acetabular socket and acrylic bone cement.  This is considered to be a low friction arthroplasty and is the one most commonly used today.
Today hip replacement surgery is done routinely on tens of thousands of patients a year. It is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures and has greatly improved the quality of life for the patients.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with an orthopedic surgeon at Flushing Hospital to discuss whether a hip replacement would benefit you, please call 718-670-5486thinkstockphotos-516732975.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is the Right Time for Knee Replacement Surgery?

If you are experiencing prolonged periods of knee pain or stiffness that makes it hard to perform simple everyday tasks, you may be a candidate for knee replacement surgery.

Knee joint orthopedic replacement implant

Knee replacement surgeries are often performed to treat patients who have suffered a serious trauma, but the most common reason for someone to need this procedure is to treat progressive osteoarthritis or other diseases that affect the knee joint. This procedure is usually a last resort and your doctor might recommend it only after all other forms of treatment or medications have proven unsuccessful.

Performed by an orthopedic surgeon, knee replacement surgery involves replacing some or all of the components of the knee joint with a synthetic implant, to repair the damaged weight-bearing surfaces that are causing pain. A total knee replacement surgery replaces all three compartments of the diseased knee joint. A partial knee replacement involves an implant in just one or two compartments of the knee, retaining any undamaged parts.

Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized knee replacement surgery. Minimally invasive knee joint replacement requires a much smaller incision, which leads to less pain, decreased recovery time and better motion due to less scar tissue formation. The average hospital stay after knee joint replacement is usually three to five days.

Rehabilitation is almost always necessary after knee replacement surgery. The physical therapy you receive after surgery, whether in a sub-acute facility, an out-patient center, or in your home is an essential part of your healing process as proper exercise will prevent scarring, maintain muscle strength and joint stability. The frequency and duration of therapy varies from patient to patient.

Flushing Hospital’s team of highly qualified orthopedic surgeons performs over 1,500 procedures every year, including hundreds of minimally invasive knee replacement procedures. They also perform surgeries to repair hip fractures, fix broken wrists and ankles, as well as shoulder replacement surgery. For more information about the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Flushing Hospital, or to schedule an appointment to speak with a surgeon, please call 718-670-3135.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How to Treat a Sprained Ankle

Ankle Tensor BandageAn ankle sprain occurs when you have stretched or torn the ligaments in your ankle. This is often caused by making too quick of a movement, which forces the joint out of its normal position.

Ankle sprains can range from mild to severe, depending on how much damage has been done to the ligaments.  Typically symptoms include:

  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Stiffness or restricted range of motion
  • Redness or warmth in the area

If your symptoms are mild you can treat your injury by:

  • Applying ice- This will help in reducing swelling and pain.
  • Resting the ankle- This can be done by using crutches and keeping the affected leg elevated.
  • Taking over the counter (OTC) painkillers- OTC painkillers such as ibuprofen are effective in managing pain and swelling.
  • Applying compressions- Wrapping your ankle with adhesive bandages or wearing a brace will help reduce swelling and provide protection.

Typically mild sprains tend to last seven to ten days; however, if you are experiencing intense pain, abnormal swelling and are unable to place weight on your ankle, it is likely that your case is severe and needs immediate medical attention.

If left untreated severe ankle sprains can lead to chronic ankle instability, chronic pain and early onset arthritis.  To reduce the risk of furthering your injury, schedule an appointment with your doctor if symptoms continue past 10 days.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Division of Orthopedics is staffed with highly trained and respected doctors in their field. The division recently welcomed fellowship-trained surgeons, Drs. George Ackerman and Teo Mendez from Manhattan-based New York Orthopedics.  Both physicians specialize in the treatment and surgical procedures of the knee, foot and ankle, shoulder, hip, and elbow, as well as sports-related injuries. They have worked extensively as team physicians for both professional and college sports teams. To schedule an appointment with an orthopedist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefit of the Annual Physical

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The greatest benefit of an annual physical is knowledge for both you and your physician.  An annual visit establishes a baseline for your personal health.  Armed with this information, your doctor can detect unhealthy trends before they become risk factors.

Nearly one third of the population with a chronic disease is unaware that they have the disease.  According to the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, as many as 100,000 lives could be saved each year by increasing preventive care services.

Health screenings, such as blood glucose and blood pressure tests can easily detect the two most chronic conditions, diabetes and hypertension before they cause serious health issues.  The Centers for Disease Control cites that seven out of every 10 deaths are caused by chronic disease.  Proper management of these conditions can prevent unnecessary hospitalization.

In order to get the most out of your annual physical, take a moment to prepare:

  • Make a list of your health concerns
  • Make a list of all the medications you are taking
  • Get a copy of your medical records and your family medical history

Dozens of Patient Care Specialists, on staff at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, are ready to provide you with your annual check-up.

Flushing Hospital is a certified Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) in its Ambulatory Care Center. The Center offers more than 50 outpatient general and specialty services for children adolescents and adults.

Flushing Hospital’s ambulatory care services accepts most major insurances, is centrally located and has convenient patient hours.  Call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Five Foods to Prevent Osteoporosis

ThinkstockPhotos-451969173Osteoporosis can strike at any age and occurs in both men and women, but it is most common in post-menopausal women. Bone is living tissue that constantly regenerates. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle making you more susceptible to fractures. The most common fractures occur in the hip, wrist or spine.

Medications, healthy diet and weight-bearing exercise can help prevent bone loss or strengthen already weak bones.

May is National Osteoporosis Month. If you suffer from osteoporosis, try adding foods that are good for your bones and rich in nutrients like calcium, vitamins D, C, and K, as well as potassium and magnesium.

.Dairy products — Low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt and cheese that contain calcium and are fortified with vitamin D, as well as fatty fishes like canned sardines, salmon (with bones), mackerel and tuna.

.Potassium — Spinach, beet greens, okra, tomato products, artichokes, plantains, potatoes, sweet potatoes, collard greens and raisins.

.Magnesium — Tomato products, raisins, potatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes, papaya, oranges, orange juice, bananas, plantains and prunes.

.Vitamin C — Red peppers, green peppers, oranges, grapefruits, broccoli, strawberries, Brussels sprout, papaya and pineapples.

.Vitamin K — Vegetables such as kale, mustard greens, turnip greens and Brussels sprout, okra, Chinese cabbage, dandelion greens, and broccoli.

If you think you have osteoporosis, make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling 718-670-5486.

For more health and lifestyle tips, follow us on Twitter @FHMC_NYC and like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/FlushingHospital.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.