Healthy Pumpkin Spice Smoothie

Directions

  1. Into a blender, add pumpkin, yogurt, milk, oats, honey, pumpkin pie spice, and ice cubes.
  2. Blend until smooth and frothy, about 1 minute. Pour into a glass and serve.

Additional Tips

Cooking Tip: Keeping the can of pumpkin in the fridge before using isn’t necessary, but helps make a colder smoothie.

Keep it Healthy: Make sure to buy 100% pure pumpkin and not pumpkin pie filling or mix, which looks similar but can have added sugar.

Tip: Plain nonfat Greek yogurt, which has more of a tangy taste as well as more protein, can be substituted for the light plain yogurt.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Is The Right Way to Brush Your Teeth?

What is the right way to brush your teeth?

A.  From side to side

B.  Up and down

C.  In small circles

If you answered A, you’re right! According to the American Dental Association you should:

  • Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums.
  • Gently move the brush from side to side in short (tooth-wide) strokes.
  • Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth.
  • To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.
  • Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and keep your breath fresh.

The ADA also recommends brushing your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled brush. The size and shape of your brush should fit your mouth allowing you to reach all areas easily. You should replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed.

To make an appointment with a dentist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call our Dental Department at 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes Awareness Month

The month of November has been designated American Diabetes Awareness Month by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States which is ten percent of the total population. There are 86 million more people who have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type II diabetes during their lifetime.
There is no cure for diabetes but there are many ways for people who have been diagnosed with the disease to live long, healthy lives if it is controlled properly. Learning to live with diabetes is one of the most important components for managing the disease. Proper nutrition, regular physical activity, monitoring blood sugar daily and taking medication to control diabetes are some of the ways complications can be prevented.
Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to many complications. It is the leading cause of blindness, non traumatic amputations, kidney disease and also increases the risk for heart attacks.
During the month of November, the ADA sponsors events around the country that serve to make people aware of the risk factors and the warning signs of diabetes. For more information on events taking place, please see the American Diabetes Association’s website at www.diabetes.org. It is important to have regular medical exams to manage diabetes successfully. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Early Onset Alzheimer’s

Many people associate Alzheimer’s disease with older adults that are advanced in age. However, the disease can also affect people who are younger than the age of 65.  When this happens, the disease is referred to as younger-onset or early onset Alzheimer’s.

Early-onset Alzheimer’s has been found to mostly affect people in their forties and fifties.   Currently, experts are unsure why some people get the disease at an earlier age than others.  Research does point to genetics as a contributing factor in some cases.

The symptoms and signs of early-onset Alzheimer’s may differ with each person and can include:

  • Personality or mood changes
  • Difficulty making decisions
  • Misplacing items on a regular basis
  • Frequently withdrawing from social situations
  • Difficulty finding the right words for specific items
  • Difficulty finishing a sentence
  • Losing track of locations, dates or times
  • Asking for the same information again and again
  • Difficulty learning new things

If you are experiencing symptoms or displaying signs of the disease on an ongoing basis, it is recommended that you consult a physician who specializes in treating Alzheimer’s.   In order to diagnose the disease, the physician may complete a comprehensive medical evaluation which can include cognitive tests, brain imaging, neurological and medical exams.

Early detection of Alzheimer’s disease can maximize the benefits received from treatment and may help you to maintain your independence longer.  Therefore, it is highly advised that you seek the assistance of a specialist immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT – DILINI “CHRISTINA” RANJANI

Dilini “Christina” Ranjani is a familiar face to many people at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC). Christina, as she prefers to be called, has been at FHMC since she was interning in her field of Art Therapy close to 7 years ago.

During her time at FHMC, Christina Ranjani grew as a clinician by earning her MS in Addiction Counselling and an MPS in Art Therapy. She is currently a full time Art Therapist at FHMC.

A typical day for Christina begins in the areas of the hospital’s 3 north 1 Unit, the Department of Psychiatry and the Chemical Dependency Unit hosting various group sessions with patients to help them redirect their behaviors by focusing positive outlets.

When asked what she finds most challenging about her job, Christina stated, “Every job has its challenges. For me, it’s challenging to get our patients to focus because most suffer with a form of addiction and/or mental illness.  It is my job to try to retrain their behavior so that it brings them to mental and physical health”

Although challenging, there are many rewards for doing the type of work that Christina does especially when she brings a patient to their mental or physical baseline with proper medication management causing them to become a productive member of society.

Christina is a proud employee who takes her job seriously.  She knows that the people entrusted to her care are at a very vulnerable emotional point in their lives and they rely on her expertise, compassion and understanding of what it will take to get them healthy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ways to Prevent Acid Reflux

How many times have you eaten something you wish you had not because you ended up with a burning sensation in your chest? This is a classic symptom of acid reflux, a condition also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD. Acid reflux is a common condition where the symptoms typically last for a few hours. Symptoms of acid reflux are a burning sensation in the abdomen and lower esophagus.                                   There are several things you can do to reduce the occurrence of acid reflux:
• Don’t eat a big meal before going to bed.
• Stop smoking.
• Elevate the head of your bed so that your head is higher than your abdomen.
• Avoid tight clothing that press on your abdomen.
• Reduce your consumption of alcohol.
If you are experiencing symptoms of acid reflux on a regular basis you should consult with a physician who may want to perform tests to find out how serious the condition is. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Does My Breath Stink?

Bad breath, medically known as halitosis can be caused by a number of factors including health problems, smoking, certain foods and poor dental health habits. If the cause of bad breath is not the result of chronic conditions such as diabetes, sinus infections or kidney disease, then chances are there is a build-up of bacteria in the mouth that gives off gases or odors.

The best recommendation is to practice good oral hygiene.  There are also a few natural remedies that can help combat bad breath, such as:

  • Drinking plenty of water.
  • Chewing a piece of lemon or orange rind.
  • Taking probiotics or eating foods that are rich in probiotics, such as yogurt.
  • Eating raw fruits and vegetables such as apples or celery.
  • Gargling with salt water.
  • Consulting a physician about colon cleansing.
  • Chewing a tablespoon of fennel seeds or making fennel tea.
  • Drinking cinnamon tea.
  • Chewing on fresh parsley.
  • Mixing apple cider vinegar with water and gargling.

Trying these natural remedies can help in keeping breath fresh; however, the best remedy is to practice good oral health by brushing and flossing teeth daily.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Organ Donor Registry Day

New York State currently holds the second lowest number of organ donors with 26% registered compared to 50% nationwide.  That’s why the state has adopted October 4, as its additional Organ Donor Registry Day.

In an effort to bolster the number of organ donors in NYS, Flushing and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s hosted a registration in their main lobby.

On hand to give their personal account of the importance of organ donation was Mary Fischer, CNA at FHMC and her daughter, Lauren Fischer, a double lung transplant recipient.

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services nearly 124,000 men, women and children are awaiting organ transplants in the US.  One organ donor can save up to eight lives, however 21 people still die each day waiting for an organ.

Here are a few popular myths and facts about organ donation:

Myth:  Age, illness or physical defects can prevent me from becoming a donor.

Fact: A person’s medical condition is evaluated at the time of death to determine what organs and tissues are viable for donation. People living with chronic diseases or those who have a history of cancer or other serious diseases are still encouraged to join the donor registry.

Myth: If doctors know that I am registered to be an organ or tissue donor, they won’t work as hard to save my life.

Fact: The first priority of a medical professional is to save lives. Organ and tissue donation isn’t even considered or discussed until after death is declared.

Myth: My religion doesn’t support organ and tissue donation.

Fact: Most religions support organ and tissue donation.  Discuss organ and tissue donation with your spiritual advisor if you have concerns on this issue.

Myth: My family will be charged for donating my organs.

Fact: Costs associated with recovering and processing organs and tissues for transplant are never passed on to the donor family.

To find out how you can register as organ, eye and/or tissue donor please visit http://www.liveonny.org/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Smoking Can Affect Digestion

Smoking can affect the body’s ability to operate properly. One of the body’s functions that smoking greatly affects is digestion.

Many organs are associated with the digestive system and they produce chemicals that aid in the breakdown of the food into nutrients and other substances that the body needs to survive. All of these organs are susceptible to changes due to the effects of smoking.

Not only can smoking elevate the risk for cancer in any of these organs but because of the body’s response to the irritants it contains, smoking can also lead to:

  • Heartburn
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Liver disease
  • Peptic ulcers
  • Polyps
  • Gallstones
  • Pancreatitis

Smoking can increase the production of pepsin which can harm the lining of the stomach, and it can have an effect on blood flow to the lining of the digestive tract which will inhibit healing. There is also a decrease in the amount of mucous that is produced and this will cause irritation of the lining of these organs because the protective layer is diminished.

One of the ways to prevent the effects of smoking on the digestive system is to stop smoking. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital to find out which way may be best for you, please call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

October is National Bullying Prevention Month

October is National Bullying Prevention Month is a nationwide campaign founded in 2006 and its mission is to reach out to communities in an effort to educate and raise awareness of bullying and the tools for prevention.

Bullying occurs when an individual or group possesses an imbalance of power, either from a physical or social status perspective, over another person or group. While bullying is prevalent among all age groups, it has become a serious cause for concern among children.

The National Bullying Prevention Center defines bullying as behavior that hurts or harms another person physically or emotionally. Those being bullied often have difficulty stopping the behavior directed at them and struggle to defend themselves.

Statistics have shown that at least 28 percent of students, ages 12-18, reported being bullied at school during the year. Additionally, 7.2 % of students admit to not going to school due to personal safety concerns. Many fear the physical and verbal aggression of their peers, and many more attend school in a state of anxiety and depression.

Many children will not tell parents they are being bullied until the situation escalates, but there a few changes in their behavior that can alert you. Signs that your child may be a victim of bullying include refusing to speak about their day at school,not wanting to go to school, unexplained marks and bruises, asking for more lunch money, complaining of frequent headaches and stomach aches,sudden loss of friends and frequent nightmares.

If you find that your child is being bullied, you will need to document the dates, times and places of the action. If the bullying is taking place on school grounds, call the school and schedule a face to face meeting with a teacher or principal. If not on school grounds, notify the police.

Most schools have adopted an anti-bullying policy. Obtain a copy to determine if the bully violated school law. Bullying is best handled when you work together, with the proper authorities.

After notification, be sure to follow up with your child, and the school, to make sure that the bullying has stopped.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.