Adult Braces

closeup of smile with white teeth

All too often, when people hear the word “braces” they associate it with a young child or adolescent with a mouth full of metal brackets. However the association of braces with children is quickly changing as more and more adults are reaping the benefits of advances in orthodontic care.

Due to improvements in hardware and technique, braces have become more obtainable and aesthetically pleasing for anyone, including adults, who are self-conscious about their smile.

“More adults are seeking orthodontic treatment to create a beautiful, healthy, straight smile,” stated Dr. Rekha C. Gehani, Chair of Orthodontics at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.

Braces offer many health benefits including improving dental hygiene and aligning teeth that are out of place. If your teeth are misaligned or crooked there may be biting or chewing issues and food buildup between teeth, which can put you at risk for developing oral diseases.

There are several kinds of braces available to adults; the type of braces your dentist may recommend depends on the severity of your dental problems. Some braces that may be suitable are:

  • Ceramic Braces – less noticeable than metal
  • Lingual Braces – invisible from the outside
  • Invisalign – nearly invisible (removable)

If you are interested in learning more about adult braces, you can schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center. Call 718-670-5521.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Veggie Alternative to Meatballs

FranGPrizeWinner

Last week we posted that Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) hosted a  Healthy Recipe Makeover Contest.

Below is the WINNING recipe.

Ingredients:

2 – Eggplants, (peeled and chopped)

2 – Packages of button mushrooms (chopped)

1 – Onion (finely chopped)

2- Cloves of garlic (finely chopped)

2- Large Egg White (lightly beaten)

1 – Teaspoon dried oregano

1 – Cup bread crumbs (whole wheat)

½ cup – Parmesan Cheese

Directions –

Sauté Eggplant, mushroom, onions and garlic until soft (let cool)

Combined Oregano, breadcrumbs and Parmesan Cheese

Add all of the above ingredients together.

Form into inch balls bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes

Place in sauce and enjoy..

Our winner assures us that “No one will know they are meatless until they bite into them.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Artificial Sweetners

Sweetener

Anyone who has ever tried to watch their weight, protect their teeth, or has been told that they have diabetes, has probably tried something made with an artificial sweetener. The concept of using sugar substitutes has been around for a very long time.  A researcher at Johns Hopkins University accidently discovered a product that would be developed into what we now know as saccharin in 1879. The use of artificial sweeteners as part of our daily lives became more prevalent in the mid 20th century.

There are six sugar substitutes that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in foods and beverages. These are aspartame, sucralose, stevia, neotame, saccharin, and acesulfame potassium. These products are very sweet and therefore only very small quantities need to be added to food and beverages to make them taste good.  For as long as these products made with artificial sweeteners have been available there has been controversy over any harmful side effects that they may pose. So far the FDA has not been able to substantiate any claims of harmful effects from their use.

As people in the United States have become more health conscious, the use of products made with artificial sweeteners has increased.  More and more products are being produced each year that are labeled “Sugar Free”, “Diet”, “Low-Cal”, “Light”, or “Artificially Sweetened”. People are naturally attracted to foods that taste sweet. It has been stated that the taste of sugar may even be addictive. While limiting the intake of sugar may be seen as a good trend, people seem to be consuming more of the artificially sweetened products which may not be beneficial in the long term. Over indulgence in products that are made with these artificial sweeteners can still cause weight gain.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Five Best Tips for Putting Your Best Fork Forward to Shed the Winter Pounds

Healthy resolutions for the New Year 2017.

Did you know that March is National Nutrition Month?  Every year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics generates a nutrition, education and information campaign.  This year’s message is “Put Your Best Fork Forward.”

Each person has the tools to make healthy dietary choices.  Now  that winter is coming to an end, and spring is approaching, it is a wonderful time to reflect on our current habits and lifestyle and decide which tools we will use to shed some excess weight gained over the winter months.

Tool #1 – Balance

  • Visit Choose My Plate at https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ – Use the “my plate” method of ½ plate non starchy veggies, ¼ plate protein, ¼ plate fiber rich carbohydrate to balance your nutrients throughout the day.
  • Drink water or mild instead of sweetened beverages (soda or juice).
  • Eat healthy snacks, such as fruits/nuts with yogurt or crackers with peanut butter.
  • Substitute processed or artificially flavored food items with natural unprocessed foods. By skipping the cookies and having a piece of fruit, you will get more vitamins and fiber allowing your body to feel more energized throughout the day.

Tool #2 – Let’s get Physical

Physical activity, in any form, is imperative for managing weight. Some ways to get more active are:

  • Consider non weight bearing exercises such as using resistance bands for building muscle and increasing flexibility, stationary bike or water aerobics.
  • Walking 10,000 steps per day is equivalent to walking five miles! Aim to achieve as many steps as possible throughout the day such as parking your car a little further from your destination, taking the stairs instead of the elevator and partaking in walking breaks, especially if you are sitting for most of the day.
  • March gives us extra daylight, so the best way to utilize this extra time is by being active. Activities such as walking, jogging, gardening, swimming and yoga are perfect ways to spend 30 minutes doing an outside activity.

Tool #3 – Reduce Stress

  • Everyone has stress which can obstruct weight loss. Stress increased the hormone called cortisol, which can contribute to weight gain.  Stress also contributes to emotional eating and other damaging behaviors.
  • It is important to ask for help and have support to get through the daily stressors of life. Consider support groups, meditation, coloring, knitting or spending time with a loved one to relieve the stressors in your daily life and help you stay focused and on track of your goals and progress.

Tool #4 – Be SMART About Your Goals

By setting SMART goals, results are greater!  SMART goals encompass five parameters to make the goal more productive:

S          is the SPECIFICS of the goal.  Is the goal definable?

M         is the MEASURABILITY of the goal. Is it possible to track/measure progress?

A          is ATTAINABILITY of the goal.  Is the goal a reasonable one ?

R          is RELEVENCY of the goal.  Is the goal worthwhile and will it meet your needs?

T          is TIMELINESS of the goal.  How much time can you give to accomplishing goals?

Tool #5 – Track Your Progress

  • Keep a diary or journal and record your progress and shortcomings.
  • Keep a food log and track your dietary intake.
  • “There’s an App for that” – There are so many wonderful Apps for goal setting and tracking caloric intake, physical activity, etc., utilize the technology on your smart phone or tablet to monitor your progress.

This article was submitted by Sadia Tahir Khan MS, RD and Michelle Hill, RD, CDN, CDE, Food and Nutrition Department of Flushing Hospital Medical Center

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Registered Dietitian Day!

FranGPrizeWinner RDDay2017-2

March 8, 2017, is Registered Dietitian Day. Every year, on the second Wednesday of the month is set aside to honor and highlight the efforts of Registered Dietitians nationwide. Dietitian-Nutritionists work in many sectors of the health field. Here at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) Dietitian-Nutritionists work to improve the health of patients, as well as staff. “Registered Dietitian-Nutrition Day is a way for us to continue to spread the word about Dietitian-Nutritionists and the work we do throughout the communities.” stated Michelle Hill, Chief Clinical Dietitian at Flushing Hospital.

In honor of the big day, New York City Council Member Peter Koo awarded a Certificate of Recognition to the hospital’s nutrition team for the commitment they have to the health of others.

Other events at Flushing Hospital included a Healthy Recipe Makeover contest. The first place winner of the contest was Fran Goulston, Coordinator, Performance Improvement, who submitted a recipe using vegetables as an alternative to using red meat in meat balls.

There are approximately 6,600 Registered-Nutritionists in New York State. Each has undergone rigorous academic coursework and training. Dietitian- Nutritionists at FHMC collectively hold bachelors, masters, and PhDs not only in the field of dietetics, but at times in other fields such as business, finance, journalism, and psychology earning them the title of “The Nutrition Experts.”

Flushing Hospital Medical Center urges everyone to make a healthy choice a day to reach your health goals.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Power of Positive Thinking

positivethinking

According to the Mayo Clinic, positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health.

Try these morning affirmations and get your day started right:

  • Today, I will think pure and positive thoughts
  • Today, I release the past and move into the present
  • Today, I choose to have joy
  • Today, I choose peace
  • Today, I realize that I am worthy of good things
  • Today, I begin to make healthy choices for my body, mind and soul
  • Today, I claim that the healthier I live my life, the better my life will be
  • Today, I like who I am

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cavity Prevention Tips

Father and son (5-7) brushing teeth in bathroom, low angle view

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) parents should instill in their children the importance of good oral hygiene at an early age, ensuring that this ritual will continue when they become adults.

It is suggested that good oral hygiene be factored together when children are taught how to keep themselves healthy.

The ADA provides these age-by-age tips:

Babies, Toddlers and Pre-School

  • After each feeding, clean the baby’s gums with a clean wet gauze pad or washcloth
  • When teeth start to appear, brush them with a child’s size toothbrush and plain water
  • Begin flossing when at least two teeth begin to touch
  • Start dental visits by the child’s first birthday and make visits regularly
  • Brush teeth of children over age two with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste and be sure to floss daily
  • Supervise your children while they are brushing their teeth to prevent them from swallowing the toothpaste

School-Age Children and Adolescents

  • Until they are six or seven years old, continue to brush your children’s teeth twice a day with a child size toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste
  • Continue to assist with flossing as needed
  • By age six or seven, children should be able to brush their own teeth twice a day but may require supervision until about age 10 or 11
  • Ask the dentist about dental sealants, protective plastic coating that can be applied to chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay often starts
  • Remind your adolescent about practicing good oral hygiene

 If your child has dental problems, you should visit a dentist as soon as possible. If you would like to schedule an appointment for your child at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center call 718-670-5522.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Sunscreen in the Winter

Campfire

Despite the cold temperatures, you can still get sunburned during the winter months. The cold temperatures can make your skin even drier than in the warmer months.

The reason being, the Earth is closest to the sun in the winter and the Earth’s Ozone Layer, or sunscreen, is thinnest during the winter months.  Even if you remain inside, you are still at risk for long wave ultraviolet A (UVA) skin damage because 50 to 60 percent of UVA rays can be received through windows.

Sometimes, the lure of winter’s outdoor activities is hard to resist.  Did you know that if you are skiing, the snow can reflect back 80 percent of the UVA rays, nearly doubling your exposure?

The strength of the winter sun’s rays (UVA) can cause redness and cracked skin, which is common when the cold, dry winter air takes moisture away from your skin.  The top layer of skin is made up of dead cells embedded in a mix of natural oils.  The oils in this layer help keep water inside the body and prevent irritants and germs from entering.

The dead cells and skin oils lock some water into the top layer, which keeps the skin soft and smooth. Cold, dry air can damage the top skin layer, allowing water to escape and cause small cracks that expose underlying cells to irritants and germs. This irritation may cause nerves in the skin to send “itch” signals to the brain.

Weather-related itching may be accompanied by other dry skin symptoms, such as dullness, flakiness, roughness and more visible fine lines. Fortunately, weather-related dry skin isn’t usually serious and is easily treated.

When you plan to be outside, it is a good habit to apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 15 about 30 minutes before going out.  If you are out for longer periods of time reapply the sunscreen every couple of hours.

If your skin has become red and cracked, you may want to make an appointment with the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center.  To schedule an appointment, call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Eyeglasses

Over 60 percent of the adult population in the United States today wears eyeglasses. Modern day eyeglasses have their roots that date back more than 1000 years. In the middle ages Monks were known to use reading stones that were glass spheres, sometimes filled with water,  that were placed on top of objects in order to magnify them. The first documented use of eyeglasses was attributed to being developed in Italy.  In the 13th century Venetian glass blowers made the first solid glass lenses that were held by frames and that were a primitive version of modern day wearable eyeglasses.
In the 17th century eyeglasses started to be made that could correct vision. Glasses could be made with either concave lenses, for nearsightedness, or convex lenses for farsightedness. Benjamin Franklin invented bifocal lenses in 1784. Glass was the material used in the production of eyeglasses for centuries until the latter part of the 20th century when plastic became widely used in eyeglasses as it was lighter and safer than glass. Now many eyeglasses are being made from polycarbonate which is lighter still and more resilient to scratches.

To schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486

Antique eyeglasses

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Don’t Sweat The Small Stuff, You Might Have A Stroke

Man hiding under laptop

Stress is a well-recognized risk factor for heart attack, but a new discovery is linking stress to strokes as well. A recent study published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry suggests that people who are impatient, aggressive, or naturally hostile may be more likely to have a stroke, compared to their more laid-back counterparts.

Can stress cause a stroke? The short answer is yes, chronic, long-term stress can eventually lead to a stroke. Do you live with chronic, long-term stress? If so, your risk of stroke increases four-fold, according to WebMD. Now there is more incentive to heed the advice, “don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Researchers who conducted a study on the effects of stress and stroke measured chronic stress in 5 major areas:

  • Personal health problems
  • Health problems in others close to the patient
  • Job or ability to work
  • Relationships
  • Finances

Use this list to assess where your chronic stress is coming from.

Knowing the signs of a stroke is important and could prevent long-term effects if caught in time. Warning signs of a stroke can be remembered by the acronym “FAST”.

Face – Ask the person to smile. Does one side droop?

Arms – Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

Speech – Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is their speech slurred or strange?

Time – If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States.  Almost 800,000 people have a stroke in the United States each year and it is responsible for approximately 130,000 deaths.

Flushing Hospital was recognized by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association for its Gold Plus level of participation in the “Get With The Guidelines Stroke and Target Stroke Program.”

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.