Smoking Cessation – Helping You Quit

Smoking cigarettes is one of the leading causes of multiple diseases and premature deaths in the United States today.   According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 16 million Americans are living with smoking-related diseases and an estimated 480,000 deaths will occur each year as a result of smoking.

Smoking cigarettes affects many aspects of health. Direct association has been established between smoking and cancers of the lung, mouth, nose, throat, larynx, esophagus, colon and rectum, stomach, pancreas, cervix, bladder, kidney and blood.

Many lung conditions are either caused or aggravated by cigarette smoke. It irritates bronchial airways and stimulates mucous production leading to decreased elasticity and functional failure. Patients suffering from COPD, asthma, chronic bronchitis or emphysema have a much higher risk of dying when repeatedly exposed to smoke.

Smokers are also at greater risk for cardiovascular disease. Smoking damages blood vessels, making them stiff and narrow. This can obstruct blood flow which may result in elevated blood pressure, heart attacks or strokes.

Smoking tobacco is an addiction similar to heroin and cocaine. It can be successfully treated, however, majority of cases require three and more attempts.

Studies have shown that these five, common sense steps, provide the best chance for quitting smoking for good:

1. Get ready: set a quit date and throw out all cigarettes and ashtrays from your home.

2. Get support: tell your family, friends and doctor about quitting plans; search the internet for advice.

3.  Learn new behaviors: distract yourself from the urge to smoke; exercise or go for a walk.

4. Get medication: combining medication like nicotine patches with behavioral adaptation and family support quadruples your chances of success.

5. Be prepared for relapse and difficult situations- most people try to quit a few times before succeeding.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center provides extensive assistance for people willing to quit smoking.  We offer a free smoking cessation support group every Wednesday. The hospital also offers one-on-one sessions, both in person or by phone.  For more information please call, 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Men’s Health Month

The month of June has been recognized as Men’s Health Month. The reason for this designation is to bring awareness of preventable health issues and to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases prevalent in men.
The leading causes of death among men are:
• Heart Disease
• Cancer
• Diabetes
• Lung Disease
• Injuries
• Stroke
• HIV/AIDS
Some of the reasons that men tend to have more serious chronic illnesses is because more men than women don’t have health insurance, men tend to have more physically demanding jobs with greater safety risks. Additionally  more men smoke than women and they also tend to  take greater risks with unsafe behavior.
Women tend to live five years longer than men and one of the reasons for this is that women usually take better care of their health. Men are often guilty of waiting until a disease has progressed to a more serious level before they seek help. There is an old adage that if a man is in a doctor’s waiting room, most likely a woman brought him there for an exam.
During the month of June, organizations across the country hold health awareness campaigns to educate men about various health issues that they may be at risk for and to encourage them to see a doctor regularly. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

MediSys Launches A New Website

Recently the Medisys Health Network launched a website called “MedisysCares”.  This site highlights eight medical conditions that are commonly found in our community and include:
Breast Cancer
Cervical Cancer
Colon Cancer
Hepatitis B and C
Human Papilloma Virus
Lung Cancer
Prostate Cancer
Smoking Cessation

The objective of this website is to reduce the incidence of these diseases in our community by promoting healthy lifestyle choices and to encourage people with these health conditions to manage their healthcare through routine follow up and compliance.
The website can be found at http://www.medisyscares.org

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Asthma and Allergies

The most common form of asthma is caused by an allergic reaction. More than fifty percent of people who suffer from asthma have this type of disease. Asthma is an airway obstruction caused by inflammation and is a reaction that people have when they are exposed to substances that they are allergic to. Some of the offending substances are pet dander, pollen, dust mites, mold and some foods. An asthma attack has three components:

• The bands of muscles surrounding the airways in the lungs tighten. This is called broncospasm.

• The lining of the airways become inflamed and swollen.

• There is an increase in mucous production in the lining of the airway.

All of these factors make it harder for air to pass through the lungs, and breathing becomes difficult.

Treatment for allergy induced asthma requires testing to see what a person is allergic to. Once these allergens have been identified the patient will be advised to avoid them. There is no cure for asthma but, there are several medications available that can help control it. Antihistamines are often administered, which help reduce the allergic reaction. A physician may prescribe corticosteroids to reduce the inflammation of the airway and make breathing easier. Some medications are given for immediate relief of symptoms. Such as broncodilators which are inhaled as needed to help to relax the airways. Other medications are used for long term control of symptoms and are taken on a daily basis. Speak to your physician if you experience difficulty breathing after coming in contact with certain substances. There are different treatment options available and you want to learn about the one that will be best for you.  You can also schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist  at Flushing Hospital by calling 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Wound healing Through the Ages

The earliest records of wound healing techniques date back to 2500 BC from ancient Egypt. Wounds were believed to have a spiritual component back then and so part of the healing process involved using donkey feces to ward off evil spirits. This actually seemed to work owing to an antibacterial effect of the material used.  As time passed, wound healing was aided by techniques that provided an antibiotic effect and included the washing of wounds with herbs, minerals, milk, and water. Hippocrates in Greece, around 400 BC described using wine or vinegar as materials needed to cleanse the wound of impurities.
As wound healing progressed it became apparent that a covering might help to protect it from further harm. After the wounds were thoroughly washed, they were dressed in wool that had been boiled in water. Cotton gauze became more widely used around the fifth century BC and was used for centuries until synthetic materials like rayon were developed in the 20th century that were more effective. Also, during the 20th century different materials were developed that were better suited to covering a wound without sticking, allowed for air to penetrate and that also contained substances that promoted quicker healing.
During the 20th century antibacterial dressings were more commonly used to keep the wounds free of bacteria. Interestingly, honey which had been employed for thousands of years was found to still be very effective as a wound healing agent because of its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Throughout history, many of the wound healing materials were developed on the battlefield. Iodine which was used as an antiseptic was used during WW I to treat gangrenous battlefield wounds and later found its way to the general public.
As advanced as the field of wound healing is today, many of the techniques developed in ancient times are still incorporated in the treatment of wounds today. It is a constantly evolving field of medicine and as wounds become more complex, so do the treatment options.
If you have a chronic or non-healing wound, you may be a candidate for Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s outpatient Wound Care Center.  To schedule an appointment or speak with a clinician, please call 718-670-4542.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Wound Healing Through the Ages

The earliest records of wound healing techniques date back to 2500 BC from ancient Egypt. Wounds were believed to have a spiritual component back then and so part of the healing process involved using donkey feces to ward off evil spirits. This actually seemed to work owing to an antibacterial effect of the material used.  As time passed, wound healing was aided by techniques that provided an antibiotic effect and included the washing of wounds with herbs, minerals, milk, and water. Hippocrates in Greece, around 400 BC described using wine or vinegar as materials needed to cleanse the wound of impurities.
As wound healing progressed it became apparent that a covering might help to protect it from further harm. After the wounds were thoroughly washed, they were dressed in wool that had been boiled in water. Cotton gauze became more widely used around the fifth century BC and was used for centuries until synthetic materials like rayon were developed in the 20th century that were more effective. Also, during the 20th century different materials were developed that were better suited to covering a wound without sticking, allowed for air to penetrate and that also contained substances that promoted quicker healing.
During the 20th century antibacterial dressings were more commonly used to keep the wounds free of bacteria. Interestingly, honey which had been employed for thousands of years was found to still be very effective as a wound healing agent because of its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Throughout history, many of the wound healing materials were developed on the battlefield. Iodine which was used as an antiseptic was used during WW I to treat gangrenous battlefield wounds and later found its way to the general public.
As advanced as the field of wound healing is today, many of the techniques developed in ancient times are still incorporated in the treatment of wounds today. It is a constantly evolving field of medicine and as wounds become more complex, so do the treatment options.
If you have a chronic or non-healing wound, you may be a candidate for Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s outpatient Wound Care Center.  To schedule an appointment or speak with a clinician, please call 718-670-4542.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and Alcoholic Beverages

People with diabetes need to be very careful if they plan on drinking anything that contains alcohol. The reason for this is consuming alcohol can have a severe impact on blood sugar levels, raising or lowering it dramatically, which can be very dangerous.
Here are some of the ways that consuming alcohol can affect diabetes:
• It affects liver function which is important for regulating blood sugar levels
• There may be an interaction with diabetes controlling medications that can lower blood sugar too much
• Some alcoholic beverages contain carbohydrates which can raise blood sugar levels
• It acts as an appetite stimulant causing a person to overeat
• It can numb the senses which may already be impaired by diabetes
Alcoholic beverages should be consumed in small quantities, no more than two drinks for men and one for women in a 24 hour time span. Drinks should be taken with food which will help with its absorption. It is important to consume alcohol slowly to give the body a chance to process it. It is also important to stay away from alcoholic beverages that are mixed with anything sugary.
If a person has diabetes and they feel like they must have an alcoholic beverage from time to time, consult a physician to understand how alcohol will interact with medications.

Whiskey with ice on a reflective background

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Nurses Week

National Nurses Week is celebrated every year from May 6th to May 12th in commemoration of Florence Nightingale’s birthday. This celebration allows us to recognize the invaluable work our outstanding nurses perform daily to improve the wellbeing of our patients and their families.

FHMC Nurses Appreciation
Flushing Hospital will be honoring their nurses and the wonderful work that they do at an event held on May 10th. At this event the nurses were served cuisine from various cultures which reflect the diverse ethnic backgrounds that make up the nursing staff at Flushing Hospital. Local city, state and federal officials awarded proclamations to the Department of Nursing recognizing their achievements, as well as their value to the health care industry and the patients that they care for.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hepatitis Awareness Month

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month which serves to educate people about the disease and ways to prevent it. Each year approximately 15,000 people die in the United States from either liver cancer or chronic liver disease caused by hepatitis.  This is one of the reasons why raising awareness about the disease is very important.

Hepatitis is defined as an inflammation of the liver and can be caused by alcohol abuse, exposure to certain toxins, drug abuse, bacterial or viral infections.The three main types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis A can be mild or severe and can last weeks to months. It is spread by contact with food, liquids and objects that are infected with fecal matter from a person who is infected. Hepatitis B can be a life long illness. It is transmitted by blood, semen or other bodily fluids and as a baby passes through the birth canal. Hepatitis C is spread through sharing needles and syringes with people who are infected.

A vaccine exists for Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B for populations that may be at risk. If you would like to find out if you are at risk for the disease, please schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-670-5486

Medical Concept- Stop Hepatitis word written on blackboard with

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Time Do You Eat Dinner ?

Family Enjoying Meal At Home Together

Typically people eat dinner between 6:00 PM and 7:30 PM. Dinner time fifty years ago people ate between 5:00 PM and 6:30PM but now due to work and commuting schedules dinner time for many of us has shifted to eating later. The time that most people sit down for their dinner also varies in different parts of the country and the world. In some places around the world dinner isn’t eaten until 9 o’clock or later.

Research has shown though that eating a big dinner close to bed time can lead to weight gain because you probably won’t burn up all of the calories you take in. Also, late night eating can increase the amount of glucose and insulin in your body which can have an Effect on your ability to fall asleep. If you are going to be eating dinner late at night, it is best to make it a light one.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.