What is a Stye and How Can it be Treated?

A stye is a red bump that develops either on the inside or the outside of your eyelid. Styes can be tender and cause minor irritation, but they are usually not serious.

Similar to how you get a pimple on your face is how you can get a stye on your eye; it is simply the result of the gland along your eyelid becoming clogged.

Signs that you have developed a stye include:

  • Redness and tender feeling near your eyelid
  • You develop a bump with a small pus spot in the center
  • You have a sensation  that there’s something in your eye
  • Your eye feels sensitive to bright light
  • There is crust along your eyelid
  • You have a scratchy or itchy feeling around the eye
  • Your eye produces extra tears

Styes typically burst and go away on their own after a few days. But there are a few tips to treat your stye and minimize some of the symptoms.

  • Soak a clean washcloth in warm water and put it over the stye for approximately five to ten minutes and repeat several times per day.
  • Clean your eyelid with a cotton swab soaked in a mild baby shampoo. Avoid using harsh soaps as they can irritate and burn your eye.
  • Resist the urge to squeeze or pop your stye. This will only make the situation worse.
  • Keep your face and eyes very clean, and get rid of any crust you see around your eye.
  • If you are experiencing soreness around the eye, you can take a pain reliever, such as ibuprofen.
  • Avoid wearing eye make-up
  • If you wear contacts, try switching to glasses. After the stye has healed, make sure you clean and disinfect your contacts or replace them with a new pair.

You shouldn’t have to see your doctor for a stye. But it’s a good idea to make an appointment if your stye doesn’t get better after a few days, if you are in a great deal of pain, or if it affects your vision.

To see a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Great American Smokeout

Every year, on the third Thursday of November, the American Cancer Society encourages everyone to take part in the Great American Smokeout. This event helps to make people aware of the dangers of using tobacco products as well as the tools that are available to help them quit smoking.
The Great American Smokeout started in 1970 in a small town in Massachusetts. People were asked to give up smoking for one day and to take the money that they would have spent on cigarettes and donate it to a local high school scholarship fund. The event spread to other cities both large and small and eventually led to legislation that bans smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and other public spaces both indoors and outdoors.
Smoking  is responsible for one in five deaths in the United States today. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Smoking is also the cause of cancer of the larynx, mouth, sinuses, throat, esophagus, and the bladder. The number of people who smoke has dramatically decreased in the United States since the anti-smoking campaigns began. In 1965 it was estimated that over 40 percent of the population were smokers and today that number is around 18 percent.
Smokers have the best chances of quitting if they use at least two of the following methods:
• Smoking Cessation Groups
• Nicotine substitute products
• Support from family and friends
• Telephone quit lines
• Counseling
• Prescription medications that help to reduce the urge to smoke
If you would like more information about quitting smoking please call the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital to discuss smoking cessation, please call 718

-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Exercise and Aging

It is never too late to begin a regular fitness routine.  In fact; the United States Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institute on Aging promotes exercise and physical activity as an important factor in healthy aging.

 

Older adults are encouraged to incorporate the following four main types of exercise into their routine:

  1. Strength Exercise
  2. Endurance Exercise
  3. Balance Exercise
  4. Flexibility Exercise

Each type of exercise offers several benefits when performed on an ongoing basis. These benefits can be achieved by doing a variety of physical activities.

  • Strength Exercise- Helps to build muscle and makes them stronger. Stronger muscles can make it possible for older adults to remain independent longer. These benefits may be achieved by participating in activities such as lifting weights or resistance training.
  • Endurance Exercise-Helps to promote a healthy heart rate and improve breathing. This type of exercise focuses on overall fitness as well as keeping the cardiovascular and respiratory systems healthy. Activities such as aerobics, swimming, walking, dancing or jogging are considered endurance exercises.
  • Balance Exercise-Helps to reduce falls, a problem that is common in older adults. This type of exercise focuses on building lower body strength. Activities such as Tai Chi, walking heel to toe and standing on one foot are considered balance exercises.
  • Flexibility Exercise-Helps to stretch muscles, promotes freedom of movement and in some instances improves balance. Examples of flexibility exercises include yoga, Pilates, bending to touch your toes or stretching your arms across your chest.

Before beginning a fitness routine, it is recommended that you speak with your doctor first.  You can work with him or her to create a routine that is compatible with your lifestyle and health. To receive more information about exercise and aging, please visit the National Institute on Aging website https://go4life.nia.nih.gov/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Pumpkin Spice Smoothie

Directions

  1. Into a blender, add pumpkin, yogurt, milk, oats, honey, pumpkin pie spice, and ice cubes.
  2. Blend until smooth and frothy, about 1 minute. Pour into a glass and serve.

Additional Tips

Cooking Tip: Keeping the can of pumpkin in the fridge before using isn’t necessary, but helps make a colder smoothie.

Keep it Healthy: Make sure to buy 100% pure pumpkin and not pumpkin pie filling or mix, which looks similar but can have added sugar.

Tip: Plain nonfat Greek yogurt, which has more of a tangy taste as well as more protein, can be substituted for the light plain yogurt.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Is The Right Way to Brush Your Teeth?

What is the right way to brush your teeth?

A.  From side to side

B.  Up and down

C.  In small circles

If you answered A, you’re right! According to the American Dental Association you should:

  • Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums.
  • Gently move the brush from side to side in short (tooth-wide) strokes.
  • Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth.
  • To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.
  • Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and keep your breath fresh.

The ADA also recommends brushing your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled brush. The size and shape of your brush should fit your mouth allowing you to reach all areas easily. You should replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed.

To make an appointment with a dentist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call our Dental Department at 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes Awareness Month

The month of November has been designated American Diabetes Awareness Month by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States which is ten percent of the total population. There are 86 million more people who have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type II diabetes during their lifetime.
There is no cure for diabetes but there are many ways for people who have been diagnosed with the disease to live long, healthy lives if it is controlled properly. Learning to live with diabetes is one of the most important components for managing the disease. Proper nutrition, regular physical activity, monitoring blood sugar daily and taking medication to control diabetes are some of the ways complications can be prevented.
Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to many complications. It is the leading cause of blindness, non traumatic amputations, kidney disease and also increases the risk for heart attacks.
During the month of November, the ADA sponsors events around the country that serve to make people aware of the risk factors and the warning signs of diabetes. For more information on events taking place, please see the American Diabetes Association’s website at www.diabetes.org. It is important to have regular medical exams to manage diabetes successfully. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Early Onset Alzheimer’s

Many people associate Alzheimer’s disease with older adults that are advanced in age. However, the disease can also affect people who are younger than the age of 65.  When this happens, the disease is referred to as younger-onset or early onset Alzheimer’s.

Early-onset Alzheimer’s has been found to mostly affect people in their forties and fifties.   Currently, experts are unsure why some people get the disease at an earlier age than others.  Research does point to genetics as a contributing factor in some cases.

The symptoms and signs of early-onset Alzheimer’s may differ with each person and can include:

  • Personality or mood changes
  • Difficulty making decisions
  • Misplacing items on a regular basis
  • Frequently withdrawing from social situations
  • Difficulty finding the right words for specific items
  • Difficulty finishing a sentence
  • Losing track of locations, dates or times
  • Asking for the same information again and again
  • Difficulty learning new things

If you are experiencing symptoms or displaying signs of the disease on an ongoing basis, it is recommended that you consult a physician who specializes in treating Alzheimer’s.   In order to diagnose the disease, the physician may complete a comprehensive medical evaluation which can include cognitive tests, brain imaging, neurological and medical exams.

Early detection of Alzheimer’s disease can maximize the benefits received from treatment and may help you to maintain your independence longer.  Therefore, it is highly advised that you seek the assistance of a specialist immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Pregnancy Increase Your Chances of Developing Gum Disease?

Hormonal changes during pregnancy can affect a woman’s body in many different ways; one such change occurs inside a woman’s mouth.

It is estimated that forty to fifty percent of all pregnant women will develop what is referred to as “pregnancy gingivitis,” a mild form of gum disease that is caused by increased production levels of the hormone progesterone.  These hormonal changes make it easier for certain gingivitis-causing bacteria to grow in your mouth and it makes your gums more sensitive to the build-up of plaque.

Taking care of your gums during pregnancy is very important. There have been multiple studies that have linked gum disease and premature birth. A study conducted by the Journal of the American Dental Association concluded that women with chronic gum disease were four to seven times more likely to deliver prematurely or have low birth weight babies than mothers with healthy gums.

Symptoms of pregnancy gingivitis can range from a slight reddening of the gums and mild inflammation to severe swelling and bleeding gums, especially after brushing or flossing. Pregnancy gingivitis can occur anytime between the second and eight month of pregnancy.

The best way to avoid pregnancy gingivitis is to maintain proper oral hygiene. It is recommended that women brush twice a day or after every meal with a soft-bristled brush and toothpaste containing fluoride. Flossing as well as using an alcohol-free, antimicrobial mouthwash daily is also suggested. In addition, don’t skip your dental visits just because you are pregnant. In fact, it is more important to see your dentist when you are pregnant. They can provide a professional cleaning and check-up.  Your dentist can also prescribe antibiotics if necessary.

By following these preventative measures, you can reduce your chances of developing pregnancy gingivitis as well as well increasing the probability of delivering a full-term baby.

If you are pregnant and would like to schedule a routine visit at Flushing Hospital’s Dental Center, please call 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Receding Gums

Receding gums, also known as gingivitis, is a condition where the gum tissue pulls back from the bottom of the teeth, exposing more of the tooth’s root. It may take a long period of time for receding gums to become noticeable and at first, it may not cause any discomfort. If it is left untreated it can cause tooth decay and eventual loss of a tooth or teeth.

Causes of receding gums:

  • Brushing teeth vigorously over a prolonged period of time
  • Family history
  • Irregular tooth positions
  • Grinding your teeth
  • Inadequate dental hygiene
  • Hormonal changes in women

There are a few things you can do to prevent receding gums and this includes brushing your teeth properly twice a day, regular flossing and professional cleaning by a dentist or dental hygienist at least once a year.

Once gums have started to recede, a dentist can try a few methods to treat the condition. They can take tissue from other areas in the mouth, usually the roof of the mouth and try to graft it into the area where gum tissue is missing.  Dentists can also  apply a technique called root planning to deep clean the exposed tooth or they may use specialized materials on patients that will help the gum to regenerate over time.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT – DILINI “CHRISTINA” RANJANI

Dilini “Christina” Ranjani is a familiar face to many people at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC). Christina, as she prefers to be called, has been at FHMC since she was interning in her field of Art Therapy close to 7 years ago.

During her time at FHMC, Christina Ranjani grew as a clinician by earning her MS in Addiction Counselling and an MPS in Art Therapy. She is currently a full time Art Therapist at FHMC.

A typical day for Christina begins in the areas of the hospital’s 3 north 1 Unit, the Department of Psychiatry and the Chemical Dependency Unit hosting various group sessions with patients to help them redirect their behaviors by focusing positive outlets.

When asked what she finds most challenging about her job, Christina stated, “Every job has its challenges. For me, it’s challenging to get our patients to focus because most suffer with a form of addiction and/or mental illness.  It is my job to try to retrain their behavior so that it brings them to mental and physical health”

Although challenging, there are many rewards for doing the type of work that Christina does especially when she brings a patient to their mental or physical baseline with proper medication management causing them to become a productive member of society.

Christina is a proud employee who takes her job seriously.  She knows that the people entrusted to her care are at a very vulnerable emotional point in their lives and they rely on her expertise, compassion and understanding of what it will take to get them healthy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.